Food Habits of the Pecan Twig Girdler


Anonymous

Florida Entomologist 7(2): 26

1923


Oncideres cingulata (hickory twig-girdler) is recorded as attacking roses in Florida. It also often attacks various trees other than the hickories, including occasionally Citrus and in the northern States apple, plum, pear and peach.

26
THE
FLORIDA
ENTOMOLOGIST
FOOD
HABITS
OF
THE
PECAN
TWIG
GIRDLER
In
the
latter
part
of
October
Mr.
Robert
R.
Thompson
of
the
Palmer
Corporation
at
Sarasota
sent
to
the
Experiment
Station
specimens
of
an
insect
that
was
severely
pruning
his
roses.
It
was
the
hickory
twig
girdler,
Oncideres
cingulata.
This
is
the
first
instance
of
its
attacking
roses
in
Florida
that
has
come
to
our
attention
altho
Felt,
in
"Insects
Affecting
Park
and
Wood-
land
Trees",
records
it
as
an
occasional
pest
of
roses.
In
Flor-
ida
in
addition
to
hickories,
including
the
pecan,
which
are
its
normal
hosts,
it
frequently
attacks
Japanese
persimmons
and
Australian
pines,
Casuarina
equsetifolia,
and
occasionally
the
water
beech,
Carpinus
Carolinana,
and
citrus
trees.
In
the
northern
states
it
commonly
attacks
elms.
Felt
also
lists
oaks,
apple,
plum,
linden,
pear,
and
peach.
A
peculiarity
of
their
attacks
upon
Australian
pines
is
that
they
seldom
lay
any
eggs
in
the
girdled
twigs.
Evidently
the
stimulus
of
the
tree
(which
is
not
really
a
pine)
excites,
thru
smell,
sight,
feel,
or
other
sense,
the
girdling
instinct
but
not
the
egg-laying
instinct.
"BRAZILIAN
ANT
EATERS"
P.
H.
ROLFS
Friends
and
Associates
or
the
Florida
Entomological
Society
:
I
send
you
words
of
greeting
from
the
land
of
the
lure,
where
the
skies
are
higher,
where
the
stars
are
more
numerous
in
the
sky,
and
where
the
Southern
Cross
shines
every
night
to
remind
one
of
his
duty
to
his
fellow
man.
Brazil,
the
land
where
great
rivers
flow
without
having
names,
where
mountain
ranges
occur
that
are
not
even
indicated
on
the
maps.
This
vast
interior
is
really
the
Brazil.
Rio
de
Janeiro,
Sau
Paulo,
and
the
other
large
coastal
cities
are
merely
cosmopolitan
conglomerations
like
New
York,
Chicago
and
New
Orleans.
One
has
to
get
away
from
these
cities
to
really
know
and
appreciate
the
Brazil
for
what
she
is.
Three
million
people
could
live
in
this
territory
and
find
themselves
less
cramped
than
a
hundred
million
in
the
United
States.
Well,
what
I
started
out
to
write
you
about
was
the
ant
eaters
of
Brazil.
At
first
you
will
say
that
this
is
not
an
ento-
mological
problem.
Maybe
the
eating
of
honey
is
not
an
ento-
mological
problem,
but
even
entomologists
condescend
at
times
to
satisfy
their
gastronomic
longings
for
that
delicacy.