Hydrastis canadensis


Anonymous

Hospital 10(236): 11

2018


APRIL
4,
1891.
THE
HOSPITAL.
baffle
all
our
efforts.
Were
it
possible
by
irrigation
to
remove
at
once
all
the
infected
lymph
and
pus
good
results
might
be
reasonably
looked
for,
but
the
mutual
relations
of
the
skull
and
brain
forbid
such
a
possibility
in
most
oases.
Still,
we
should
do
what
we
can
to
effect
this
as
far
as
is
possible,
and
so
disinfectant
irrigation
should
always
be
added
to
drainage
in
these
cases,
and
the
drainage
should
be
as
free
as
possible,
for
which
purpose
a
large
trephine
opening,
or
more
than
one,
is
indispensable.
The
issue,
it
the
patient
be
left
alone,
is
certainly
fatal,
so
no
objection
can
be
urged
against
any
measure
that
promises
even
a
remote
chance
of
success.
Above
all
things,
it
is
necessary
to
operate
early
if
any
good
is
to
be
gained.
THERAPEUTICS.
HYDRASTIS
CANADENSIS.
The
Hydrastis
Canadensis,
or
Golden
Seal,
has
long
beon
used
by
the
North
American
Indians
for
a
yellow
dye
ex-
tracted
from
the
root,
the
part
of
the
plant
used
in
medicine.
The
rhizome,
when
fresh
cut,
is
bright
yellow
;
this,
when
dried,
assumes
a
dark
yellowish-brown
colour.
It
has
a
bitter
and
peculiar
taste.
The
active
principle,
hydrastin,
was
first
discovered
by
Mr.
A.
B.
Durand,
of
Philadelphia.
A
second
alkaloid,
berberine,
which
imparts
the
yellow
colour
to
the
root,
was
identified
by
Mr.
F.
Mahla
as
berberine,
an
alkaloid
not
peculiar
to
this
plant.
Hydrastin
forms
brilliant
colourless
crystals
in
four-sided
prisms,
with-
out
smell,
and
with
hardly
any
taste,
being
insoluble
in
saliva.
It
is
almost
insoluble
in
water,
but
is
dissolved
by
ether,
alcohol,
or
chloroform.
Its
physiological
action
is
mainly
on
the
spinal
cord,
producing
violent
tetanic
spasms,
the
fatal
result
being
due
to
asphyxia
from
spasm
of
the
respira-
tory
muscles.
Fellner
has
shown
that
its
action
is
accompanied
by
a
slight
rise
in
arterial
pressure,
large
doses
lowering
arterial
pressure.
No
rise
of
arterial
pressure
followed
if
the
spinal
cord
was
previously
divided,
thus
its
action
in
this
respect
is
probably
due
to
its
stimulation
of
the
vaso-motor
centre,
the
larger
doses
exhausting
and
paralysing
this
centre,
and
thus
producing
a
fall
in
the
arterial
pressure.
Fellner
and
others
have
observed
its
powerful
action
on
the
uterus,
uterine
contractions
being
produced
in
the
non-
pregnant
uterus,
and
in
pregnant
rabbits
abortion.
Ruther-
ford
has
found
it
a
stimulant
of
the
hepatic
secretions.
In
its
local
action
on
the
mucous
membranes
it
has
proved
of
considerable
service.
It
has
been
successfully
applied
in
catarrh,
especially
in
the
gastro-intestinal
catarrh
of
alcoholics.
It
has
also
been
used
in
chronic
pharyngitis,
otorrhma,
nasal,
urethral,
and
vaginal
catarrh,
and
in
the
later
stages
of
gonorrhoea.
Internally
administered,
it
is
of
greatest
service
in
various
uterine
disorders,
especially
in
congestive
dysmenorrhoea,
and
in
uterine
myomata.
A
new
alkaloid
has
recently
been
prepared
by
Dr.
Falk,
to
which
he
gives
the
name
hydrastinine.
It
is
obtained
by
heating
a
mixture
of
hydrastin
and
nitric
acid,
and
precipitating
with
an
alkali.
Hydrastinine
is
a
white
crystalline
powder.
The
most
convenient
salt
for
mixtures
appears
to
be
the
hydrochlorate,
which
is
freely
soluble
in
water.
Its
physiological
action
is
not
identical
with
that
of
hydrastin,
it
having
a
more
decidedly
stimulant
action
in
the
vaso-motor
centres,
producing
a
more
persistent
contrac-
ton
of
the
vessels,
without
giving
rise
to
the
same
degree
of
spinal
irritation,
and
not
producing
tetanic
convulsions
in
fairly
large
doses.
This
drug
has
been
recommended
by
Dr.
Falk,
after
considerable
experience,
as
a
uterine
hcemostatic,
preferable
to
ergot
and
ergotine.
He
injects
a
five
to
ten
per
cent.
solution
hypodermically,
and
in
none
of
his
cases
did
he
observe
the
slightest
irritation
at
the
seat
of
the
injection.
Dr.
Falk's
experience
with
hydrastinine
is
not
borne
out
by
some
other
observers,
who
have
found
it
less
powerful
in
its
action
as
a
hmmostatic
than
hydrastin.
NEW
DRUGS,
APPLIANCES,
AND
THINGS
MEDICAL.
[All
preparations,
appliances,
novelties,
etc.,
of
which
a
notice
is
desired,
should
be
sent
for
The
Editor,
to
care
of
The
Manager,
140,
Strand.
London,
W.0.]
ANTISEPTIC
DRESSINGS,
&c.
Mr.
John
Milne,
Ladyweil
Antiseptic
Dressings
Factory,
S.E.,
has
forwarded
to
us
a
sample
case
of
the
above
for
notice.
Coming
as
they
do
from
the
original
maker
of
such,
goods
for
Sir
Joseph
Lister,
we
should
expect
the
best
forms
of
dressings
for
maintaining
asepsis
after
and
during
opera-
tions,
and
we
are
not
disappointed.
We
can
add
our
emphatic
testimony
to
the
value
of
these
dressings,
having
used
them
for
some
years
past
with
comfort
to
ourselves
and.
safety
to
our
patients.
First,
then,
we
have
the
various
forms
of
sal
alembroth
preparations,
wool,
capable
of
absorb-
ing
fifteen
times
its
weight
of
water,
lint
and
absorbent
bandages.
Next,
Sir
J.
Lister's
last
form
of
aseptic
gauze,
the
Double
Cyanide,
which,
we
are
informed,
is
used
in
nearly
every
one
of
the
leading
hospitals,
not
only
in
the
United
Kingdom,
but
also
very
largely
abroad
as
well.
Some
surgeons
prefer
iodoform
to
mercurial
dressings,
so
Mr.
Milne
has
provided
for
them
with
excellent
applications,
gauze
(20
per
cent.),
wool
and
lint
(10
per
cent.)
;
and
for
those
who
like
tow
as
a
dressing,
there
is
the
Red
Cross
antiseptic,
carbolised
tow
(10
per
cent.
carbolic
acid
crystals
and
25
per
cent.
pine
tar).
Amongst
the
contents
of
the
case
we
were
pleased
to
note
an
open-wove
bandage
for
plaster-of-
Paris,
the
particular
value
of
which
lies
in
the
fact
that
it
is
two
yards
longer
than
the
usual
run
of
such
bandages.
No
one
who
has
made
these
bandages
will
fail
to
appreciate
the
value
of
these
extra
two
yards,
saving,
as
they
often,
will,
the
making
of
an
extra
bandage,
of
which
only
a
little
may
be
used,
the
remainder
being
wasted
or
being
coiled
on
the
limb,
uselessly
adding
to
the
weight
of
the
splint.
Then
we
have
long
glass
flasks
with
catgut
ligatures,
so
arranged
that
they
can
be
drawn
out
at
once
without
having
to
unwind
them,
and
ready
cut
to
a
proper
length,
so
that
as
fast
as
they
are
wanted
they
can
be
extracted
and
used.
The
aseptic
catgut
is
kept
in
highly
carbolised
oil.
Then
there
are
silk
ligatures
on
glass
reels,
both
Alembroth
pre-
pared
and
carbolised.
These
can
be
placed
in
the
trays
and
the
lengths
cut
off
as
required.
Added
to
these
are
the
flasks
with
drainage
tubes
in
antiseptic
fluids.
Mr.
Milne
has
a
useful
stand
for
hospital
operating
theatres,
in
which
these
appliances
are
so
arranged
on
a
large
scale
that
the
surgeon
can
at
once
make
use
of
any
sized
ligature,
suture,
or
tube
that
he
may
require.
The
dressings
are
put
up
in
large
or
small
packets.
Per-
sonally,
we
always
order
the
small
packets,
as
then
only
as
much
of
a
material
as
is
wanted
for
a
dressing
is
used,
the
essence
of
the
using
being
in
the
statement,
"
Don't
open
the
packet
till
the
dressing
is
applied,"
and
thus
no
soiling
of
remainder
occurs,
and
the
next
patient
gets
an
absolutely
antiseptic
dressing,
and
not
one
which
possibly
has
become
contaminated.
When
we
are
constantly
seeing
the
pink
packets
of
Milne's
productions
in
use
at
hospitals
and
brought.
out
of
the
cases
of
surgeons
at
private
operations,
there
is
little
left
for
us
to
say
in
praise
of
them.
Suffice
it
to
say
we
know
of
none
better.
BOOKS
RECEIVED,
SWAN
SONNENSCHEIN
AND
CO.
"The
New
York
State
Reformatory
in
Elmira."
Alexander
Winter,
P.S.S.
Price
2e.
6d.
"
Crime
and
its
Causes."
By
William
Douglas
Morrison.
Price
2s.
6d.
,
WILIGHT
AND
CO.
(Bristol).
"
Onr
Baby."
Mrs.
Langton
Hewer.
Price
le.
6d.
"
Lectures
on
Diabetes."
Robert
Sauxidby,
M.D.