Studies of Indo-Australian solitary wasps (Hymenoptera, Vespoidea, Eumenidae)


Van-Der-Vecht, J.

Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, Proceedings Series C: Biological and medical sciences 84(4): 443-464

1981


ENTOMOLOGY
Proceedings
C
84
(4),
December
21,
1981
Studies
of
Indo-Australian
solitary
wasps
(Hymenoptera,
Vespoidea,
Eumenidae)
by
J.
van
der
Vecht
Burg.
Vermeerlaan
4,
3881
GZ
Putten,
the
Netherlands
Communicated
at
the
meeting
of
April
25,
1981
ABSTRACT
Descriptions
and
figures
are
given
of
Mitrodynerus
vitripennis
gen.
nov.
and
spec.
nov.,
known
from
a
single
female
collected
in
1927
in
Sri
Lanka,
a
peculiar
Eumenid
perhaps
most
closely
related
to
the
American
genus
Maricopodynerus;
Delta
magnum
spec.
nov.,
9,
Philippine
Is.;
Delta
versicolor
spec.
nov.,
9
a,
Solomon
Is.;
Antepipona
brunnipes
pocilloides
subsp.
nov.,
9
a,
Sumba;
Alastor
abditus
spec.
nov.,
9
a,
Sri
Lanka,
Alastor
sulcatus
spec.
nov.,
9
<D.,
Southern
India
and
Sri
Lanka.
A
key
is
presented
to
the
four
known
Oriental
Alastor
species
which
in
view
of
their
close
relationship
to
a
group
of
Southern
African
species
might
be
Gondwana
relicts.
The
forms
circinale
(F.)
and
rufonigerrimum
Giordani
Soika
are
both
treated
as
subspecies
of
Delta
pyriforme
(F.).
The
subsp.
chloroticum
of
Delta
campaniforme
(F.)
is
transferred
in
the
same
rank
to
Delta
paraconicum
Giordani
Soika.
Additional
information
is
given
on
several
species
of
Delta
and
on
Eumenes
piriformis
Saussure.
Eumenes
compressus
Saussure
and
Eumenes
citreolineatus
Giordani
Soika
are
new
synonyms
of
Eumenes
atrophicus
Fabricius.
The
correct
name
of
the
type
species
of
Cyphodynerus
Van
der
Vecht
is
C.
canaliculatus
(Saussure).
New
specific
names
are
proposed
for
Odynerus
xanthozonus
Cameron,
1911,
nec
Cameron,
1908,
now
Pseudalastor
xanthozonellus,
and
for
Odynerus
luzonensis
Schulthess,
1934,
nec
Rohwer,
1919,
now
Parancis-
trocerus
luzonicola.
New
combinations
are
Pareumenes
(Nortonia)
taiwanus
(Sonan),
Ectopio-
glossa
taiwana
(Sonan),
and
Ischnocoelia
ecclesiastica
(Rayment).
The
author
of
Ectopioglossa
polita
subsp.
australensis
is
Meade-Waldo,
not
Perkins.
INTRODUCTION
The
specimens
discussed
in
this
paper
are
preserved
in
several
institutions,
indicated
in
the
text
by
the
following
abbreviations:
AMNH
American
Museum
of
Natural
History,
New
York
B1SH
Bernice
P.
Bishop
Museum,
Honolulu,
Hawaii
443
BM
British
Museum
(Natural
History),
London
BPI
Bureau
of
Plant
Industry,
Manila,
Philippines
CAS
California
Academy
of
Sciences,
San
Francisco
DAPM
Department
of
Agriculture,
Part
Moresby,
New
Guinea
MA
Instituut
voor
Taxonomische
Zoologie,
ZoOlogisch
Museum,
Amsterdam
MCZ
Museum
of
Comparative
Zoology,
Cambridge,
Mass.
ML
Rijksmuseum
van
Natuurlijke
Historie,
Leiden
NMB
Naturhistorisches
Museum,
Basel
UK
University
of
Kansas,
Lawrence
USNM
United
States
National
Museum
of
Natural
History,
Washington
D.C.
With
gratitude
I
acknowledge
the
cooperation
of
the
various
entomologists
of
these
institutions
who
made
the
material
available
for
study.
I
am
also
indebted
to
Dr.
Henry
Townes,
Ann
Arbor,
for
the
loan
of
valuable
material
from
his
private
collection
and
to
Prof.
Dr.
J.
T.
Wiebes,
Leiden
University,
for
critically
reading
the
manuscript.
The
illustrations
were
made
with
a
Wild
binocular
microscope
with
drawing
apparatus.
All
scale
lines
represent
0.5
mm.
Mitrodynerus
gen.
nov.
(figs.
1-12)
Head
(figs.
1-5)
thick,
in
frontal
view
subcircular,
with
relatively
long
upper
eye
lobe;
occipital
carina
well
developed,
with
blunt
angle
behind
lower
eye
lobe,
in
upper
part
obliterated
and
rather
indistinct;
clypeus
much
wider
than
long,
its
anterior
margin
very
narrowly
truncate;
post-ocellar
fovea
a
small
subcircular
impression,
bordered
posteriorly
by
fine
arcuate
carina;
antennal
sockets
very
close
to
upper
margin
of
clypeus.
Mandible
with
four
teeth,
the
proximal
tooth
broad
and
weakly
emarginate.
Maxillary
palpus
with
six
segments,
the
terminal
three
segments
slightly
shorter
than
the
others;
labial
palpus
with
four
segments,
the
third
with
curved
apical
bristle.
Antenna
short
and
rather
stout,
segment
3
less
than
1.5
times
as
long
as
wide
at
apex,
segment
10
slightly
more
than
1.5
times
as
wide
as
long,
12
as
long
as
wide.
Thorax
(fig.
6)
longer
than
wide
(4:3);
pronotum
narrowed
towards
the
head,
its
sides
rounded,
anterior
surface
with
small
median,
punctiform,
impression,
transverse
carina
well
developed
on
sides
but
very
low
dorsally;
as
seen
from
behind
the
humeral
angles
are
rounded
and
hardly
visible;
spiracular
lobe
bordered
on
inner
side
anteriorly
by
a
groove,
posteriorly
by
the
anterior
end
of
the
blunt
and
shiny,
slightly
sinuate,
pretegular
carina;
mesepisternum
with
epipleural
suture,
without
epicnemial
carina;
tegula
(fig.
7)
slightly
longer
than
wide;
lateral
cavity
of
scutellum
narrow;
metanotum
slightly
sloping;
propodeum
without
dorsal
and
lateral
carinae,
posterior
face
slightly
concave,
on
basal
half
with
median
groove,
posterior
margin
indicated
by
very
tine
carina,
produced
on
each
side
into
a
rounded
apical
lamella
(fig.
10).
Tarsal
segments
2-4
of
fore
leg
slightly
asymmetrical,
the
anterior
lobes
(legs
stretched
sidewards)
slightly
longer
than
the
posterior
ones,
the
difference
is
also
visible,
but
less
pronounced,
on
the
mid
and
hind
legs;
basitarsus
of
fore
leg
flattened,
about
three
times
as
long
as
wide,
shorter
than
segments
2-5
together
(4:5),
basitarsus
of
mid
leg
more
slender
(length:
width
=
5:1)
and
also
shorter
than
segments
2-5
together
(3:4),
hind
basitarsus
eight
times
as
long
as
wide
and
slightly
longer
than
segments
2-5
together.
Wing
venation
as
in
fig.
8.
Shape
of
gastral
segments
1
and
2
(figs.
9-12),
particularly
the
broad
apical
lamella
of
tergite
2,
very
unusual.
C7
0
1
0
0
0
'
5
;1"
-
rrurre
-
7
:
:
8
12
11
.1".
i
f
\
:
i....
'
.
----.
..: .79
.;
.
„...
.
5
(
-1462..cstC..‘
,
..!..:'
----.—
.....
.-•
CGCC
,
Goa
RY
,
10
Figs.
1-12.
Mitrodynerus
vitripennis
spec.
nov.
9
:
1-3,
frontal,
lateral
and
dorsal
view
of
head;
4,
antenna;
5,
labial
palpus;
6,
dorsal
view
of
thorax;
7,
tegula;
8,
wings;
9,
first
gastral
sternitc;
10,
tip
of
propodeum,
and
gastral
segments
1
and
2;
11,
postero-dorsal
view
of
tergite
2
(in
plane
of
posterior
lamella);
12,
dorsal
view
of
tergites
1
and
2,
with
sample
of
puncturation.
445
Mitrodynerus
vitripennis
spec.
nov.
9
Body
moderately
shiny,
almost
without
pubescence;
head,
thorax,
tergite
1
and
segment
2
densely
and
coarsely
punctate
(samples
in
figs.
3
and
12),
interspaces
on
genae
and
sternite
2
somewhat
larger
than
elsewhere;
anterior
face
of
pronotum
in
middle
with
impunctate
area,
sides
of
propodeum
and
greater
part
of
sternite
1
(fig.
9)
rugose,
the
latter
with
indistinct
median
ridge;
presulcal
part
of
sternite
2
finely
reticulate,
the
sulcus
with
more
than
a
dozen
transverse
ridges;
tergite
2
with
subapical
row
of
large,
transparent,
punctures.
Black;
ferruginous:
mandibles,
except
for
dark
margins,
maxillae,
ill-defined
mark
at
apex
of
clypeus,
ventral
side
of
flagellum,
sides
and
greater
part
of
declivity
of
propodeum,
ill-defined
area
at
base
of
tergite
1,
most
of
legs;
pale
yellow
(see
figures):
interrupted
band
at
base
of
clypeus,
stripe
on
antenna!
scape,
two
transverse
spots
on
pronotum,
small
marks
on
tegulae,
a
minute
spot
on
each
side
of
metanotum,
apical
bands
on
tergites
1
and
2,
the
latter
much
dilated
medially,
two
basal
spots
and
apical
band
on
sternite
2,
anterior
surface
of
mid
and
hind
coxae,
small
spot
at
apex
of
mid
femur,
stripe
on
fore
tibia,
interrupted
stripe
on
mid
tibia,
and
elongate
spot
at
apex
of
hind
tibia;
brown:
dorsal
side
of
antennal
scape,
mid
and
hind
tibiae
and
basitarsi.
Wings
hyaline,
marginal
cell
slightly
infuscate
anteriorly,
venation
brown,
stigma
yellowish.
Length
to
end
of
gastral
segment
2:
9-10
mm.
Sri
Lanka,
1
9
Eastern
Province,
Trincomalee
district,
Kanniyai,
12
July
1927:
leg.
G.
M.
Henry.
The
type
is
property
of
the
Colombo
Museum,
provisionally
kept
in
the
U.
S.
National
Museum
on
an
extended
long
term
loan
basis.
The
nearest
relative
of
this
remarkable
and
evidently
very
rare
wasp
is
perhaps
the
American
genus
Maricopodynerus,
which
it
resembles
in
general
shape
of
head
and
gaster
(particularly
the
long
and
strongly
convex
second
tergite),
wing
venation,
shape
of
legs
and
other
details.
There
are,
however,
also
several
differences:
in
the
new
species
the
mandibles
and
palpi
are
relatively
shorter,
the
scutellar
cavities
are
smaller,
the
metanotum
is
less
strongly
sloping,
the
apex
of
the
marginal
cell
is
closer
to
the
wing
margin,
the
tarsal
claws
are
slightly
more
curved,
the
first
gastral
tergite
is
relatively
longer
and
narrower
and
lacks
the
pre-apical
median
impression,
and
the
strongly
raised
posterior
margin
of
tergite
2
is
a
character
not
found
in
any
of
the
seven
known
species
of
Maricopodynerus.
Delta
magnum
spec.
nov.
(figs.
13,
15)
9
Very
similar
to
Delta
pyriforme
philippinense
(Bequaert),
but
larger
and
more
robust,
and
at
once
distinguished
by
the
antennae
which
are
dull
red
ventrally
and
nearly
entirely
black
dorsally
(segments
4-6
and
12
partly
with
reddish
tinge).
Clypeus
truncate
anteriorly
(fig.
13)
(weakly
emarginate
in
D.
p.
philippinense,
fig.
14).
Transition
from
dorsal
to
lateral
areas
of
propodeum
less
gradual
than
in
the
latter
species,
bluntly
angular,
but
rather
irregular.
446
Swollen
part
of
gastral
petiole
(fig.
15)
dorsally
sparsely
and
finely
punctate,
the
latero-ventral
surface
(slightly
concave
area
behind
spiracle)
with
at
least
20-30
well
defined,
moderately
coarse
punctures
(in
D.
p.
philippinense,
fig.
16,
the
dorsal
surface
of
the
petiole
is
almost
impunctate,
the
puncturation
behind
the
spiracle
is
finer,
sparser,
and
more
superficial).
Whereas
in
the
latter
species
gastral
sternite
5
is
mainly
dark
brown
with
reddish
posterior
margin,
it
is,
like
the
sixth,
almost
entirely
pale
reddish
in
D.
magnum;
also
the
posterior
margin
of
sternite
4
is
more
or
less
reddish.
Length
to
end
of
gastral
segment
2:
27-31
mm,
against
23-26
mm
in
D.
p.
philippinense.
The
holotype
is
a
9
from
Los
Balios,
collected
July
1952
by
the
Townes
family
(coll.
H.
Townes);
all
other
specimens
recorded
below
are
paratypes.
Philippine
Islands:
Luzon,
1
9
Los
Banos,
27
July
1945,
B.
Malkin
(USNM),
3
9
Los
Banos,
19
July
1952,
30
Nov.
1952
and
8
Dec.
1953,
Townes
family
(coll.
Townes,
1
9
ML);
1
9
Mt.
Maquiling,
leg.
Baker
(USNM),
I
9
do.,
294
m,
7
Aug.
1949,
S.
Calaustro
(BPI),
1
9
do.,
9
Sept.
1953,
R.Ballesteros
(coll.
Giordani
Soika);
1
9
Sierra
Madre
Mts.,
Sn.
Miguel,
Bulacan,
April
1960,
A.
Concepcion
(BPI);
2
9
Camarines
Sur,
Mt.
Isarog,
750-850
m,
8-9
May
and
15-17
May
1963,
H.
M.
Torrevillas
(BISH,
ML);
1
9
Bagamong
(MCZ).
Mindanao,
2
9
Dapitan,
leg.
Baker
(USNM,
ML),
1
9
Davao,
leg.
Baker
(USNM);
1
9
Pikit,
Cot.,
13
June
1953,
H.
Townes
(coll.
Townes);
1
9
Calian,
Davao
Prov.,
C.
S.
Clagg
(MCZ).
Palawan,
2
9
13
14
15
17
16
Figs.
13
and
15.
Delta
magnum
spec.
nov.
9:
13,
clypeus;
15,
lateral
view
of
gastral
segment
1.
Figs.
14
and
16.
Delta
pyriforme
philippinense
(Bequaert)
9
:
14,
clypeus;
16,
lateral
view
of
gastral
segment
I.
Fig.
17.
Delta
versicolor
spec.
nov.
o•:
volsella.
447
8-13
km.
E.
of
Tarumpitao,
70
m,
in
jungle,
21
and
24
May
1958,
H.
E.
Milliron
(BISH,
ML).
Note.
It
seems
possible
that
D.
magnum
has
developed
from
an
earlier
invasion
in
the
Philippines
of
the
wide-spread
Delta
pyriforme,
but
its
relationship
to
this
species
remains
uncertain
so
long
as
the
male
has
not
been
studied.
Delta
pyrifortne
rufonigerrimum
Giordani
Soika,
status
nov.
Giordani
Soika
(1973:
131)
has
described
this
form
as
a
subspecies
of
Delta
circinale
(Saussure),
but
provisionally
I
prefer
to
regard
pyrifortne
and
circinale
as
no
more
than
subspecifically
different.
According
to
the
distribution
map
presented
by
Giordani
Soika
(1958:
196,
fig.
6)
there
is
a
small
zone
of
overlap
of
the
two
forms
in
Peninsular
Thailand,
but
I
have
not
seen
any
detailed
data
on
the
distribution
in
this
area.
Apparently
the
subsp.
rufonigerrimum,
originally
described
from
the
series
collected
by
Rouyer
in
Amboina
in
1901,
inhabits
the
Southern
Moluccas.
In
Ambon
as
well
as
in
Ceram
the
coloration
of
the
clypeus
of
the
female
appears
to
be
variable:
it
is
almost
entirely
black
(anterior
margin
reddish)
in
one
of
the
females
from
Ambon,
and
red
with
vague
blackish
band
below
the
middle
in
one
from
Ceram;
other
specimens
show
various
transitional
patterns.
Ambon:
2
9
Amboina,
Aug.
1901,
Rouyer
(MCZ;
one
with
label:
"stylopized,
parasite
taken");
4
9
4
o•
Amboina,
1908,
F.
Muir
(BISH;
1
9
1
ML).
Ceram:
2
9
Wahai,
T.
Barbour
(MCZ;
ML),
1
9
Piru
("Piroe"),
Febr.
1909,
F.
Muir,
from
coll.
W.
M.
Giffard
(BISH).
Delta
paraconicum
subsp.
chloroticum
Giordani
Soika,
status
nov.
In
1898
P.
Cameron
described
an
Indian
wasp
under
the
name
Pterochilus'
fulvipennis.
At
a
later
date
this
author
(Cameron
1907:
1008)
erroneously
recorded
some
specimens,
collected
by
Col.
Nurse
at
Deesa,
as
Eumenes
fulvipennis
Cam.,
indicating
in
a
footnote
that
the
species
described
in
1898
should
be
placed
in
the
genus
Eumenes.
In
this
genus,
however,
the
name
fulvipennis
is
preoccupied
by
Eumenes
fulvipennis
Smith,
1857.
Bequaert
(1928:
167),
who
regarded
the
Deesa
specimens
as
a
variety
of
Eumenes
campaniformis
(Fabricius),
discovered
the
homonymy
and
proposed
the
name
cameroni
to
replace
fulvipennis
Cameron.
He
overlooked,
however,
that
Cameron's
species
was
not
originally
described
from
the
Deesa
material
and
he
incorrectly
designated
two
of
the
specimens
from
this
locality
as
holotype
(a)
and
allotype
(
9
).
The
true
holotype
of
Pterocheilus
fulvipennis
Cameron,
a
female
wasp
in
the
collection
of
the
Oxford
University
Museum,
represents
a
species
of
the
genus
Pareumenes.
Actually
it
would
therefore
have
been
unnecessary
to
replace
the
I.
correct
spelling:
Prerocheilus.
448
name
fulvipennis,
but
since
the
name
was
rejected
as
a
secondary
homonym,
it
cannot
be
restored
(Art.
59(b)
of
the
Code,
Bull.
zool.
Nomencl.
31:
83,
1974).
The
species,
originally
described
by
Cameron
and
correctly
called
Pareumenes
cameroni
(Bequaert),
is
a
subjective
junior
synonym
of
Pareumenes
brevirostratus
(Saussure)
(Van
der
Vecht,
1963:
19).
The
specimens
from
Deesa,
erroneously
designated
as
types
of
"Eumenes
cameroni"
by
Bequaert,
belong
to
a
form
recently
described
by
Giordani
Soika
(1979:
263)
as
Delta
campaniforme
(F.),
ssp.
chloroticum,
new
subspecies.
The
type
locality
Deesa,
situated
near
the
Northern
border
of
the
Indian
province
Gujarat,
is
erroneously
recorded
by
this
author
as
situated
in
Pakistan
and
belonging
to
the
palaearctic
region.
A
specimen
from
the
same
locality,
collected
by
Nurse
and
very
probably
also
belonging
to
chloroticum,
was
incorrectly
identified
by
Dover
and
Rao
(1922: 239)
as
Eumenes
lepeletieri
var.
asinus
Saussure,
originally
described
from
Senegal!
Examination
of
the
male
of
this
form
(not
known
to
Giordani
Soika)
has
shown
that
it
is
clearly
different
from
Delta
campaniforme
and
agrees
in
structure
and
sculpture
with
Delta
paraconicus
Giordani
Soika
(1972:
107),
described
from
Southern
India.
Notably
the
terminal
antennal
segment
is
destinctly
shorter
and
the
fore
tarsi
are
narrower
than
in
D.
campaniforme.
It
is
of
interest
to
note
that
the
rather
dark,
mainly
ferruginous
form
of
the
relatively
moist
Southern
India
resembles
Delta
emarginatum
conoideum
(Gmelin)
in
colour
pattern,
whereas
the
mainly
yellow
subspecies
chloroticum
inhabits
a
much
drier
area,
where
many
wasps
have
rich
yellow
markings.
Delta
versicolor
spec.
nov.
(fig.
17)
The
following
description
is
mainly
meant
to
show
features
in
which
this
species
differs
from
typical
Delta
campanifortne
(Fabricius).
9
-
Clypeus
shallowly
emarginate
anteriorly,
yellow,
laterally
and
above
(except
in
median
emargination)
with
black
stripe.
Yellow
markings
at
inner
orbits
narrow,
not
or
hardly
reaching
middle
of
lower
margin
of
eye-sinus.
lnterantennal
mark
usually
only
slightly
extending
above
level
of
antennal
sockets.
Antenna
ferruginous,
scape
yellowish
at
base
in
front,
and
with
fuscous
stripe
above,
segments
7-12
fuscous
dorsally,
8,
11
and
12
less
extensively
so
than
the
others.
Yellow
line
on
temples
narrow,
about
as
long
as
antennal
segments
2
and
3
together.
Yellow
area
of
pronotal
dorsum
posteriorly
irregular,
not
extending
to
hind
margin,
often
tinged
with
orange.
Scutum
very
densely
punctate,
with
fine
brownish
tomentum
(well
visible
in
lateral
view)
and
in
addition
with
numerous
thin,
erect,
longer
hairs
(shorter
than
those
on
propodeum).
Tegula
black
anteriorly,
with
brownish
band
across
middle
and
yellow
spot
near
posterior
margin.
Scutellum
densely
and
rather
coarsely
punctate,
with
ferruginous
transverse
band,
the
black
band
in
front
of
it
narrower
than
that
behind
it.
Mesepisternum
black
with
ferruginous,
sometimes
yellowish,
mark
in
upper
part
between
humeral
tubercle
and
transverse
suture.
Metanotum
with
narrow
ferruginous
band
at
hind
margin.
Propodeum
black
with
large
ferruginous
mark
on
each
side.
449
Legs
ferruginous,
coxae
and
trochanters
mainly
dark
brown
to
blackish;
yellow:
outer
side
of
fore
femur
and
tibia,
dorsal
side
of
fore
basitarsus,
vague
spots
at
apex
of
mid
and
hind
tibia.
Gastral
segment
1
red,
tergite
black
at
base
and
dorsally
with
black
apical
spot
covering
about
1
/
4
to
1
/
2
of
its
length,
close
to
apical
margin
with
inter-
rupted
reddish
band
(width
about
Y6
of
length
of
tergite);
posterior
angles
usually
with
small
yellow
spot.
Tergite
2
black
with
extensive
red
area
at
base
and
with
subapical
yellow
band
(width
about
I
/6
of
length
of
tergite)
which
is
more
or
less
narrowly
interrupted
in
the
middle.
Tergites
3-5
with
narrower
apical
yellow
band,
on
each
side
emarginate
anteriorly
and
with
narrow
median
interruption.
Sternite
2
mainly
reddish,
with
irregular
dark
subapical
band,
sternites
3
and
4
brownish
with
yellowish
apical
band,
5
and
6
almost
entirely
yellowish.
Length
to
end
of
gastral
segment
2:
15-18
mm.
o
-
Very
similar
to
9
,
but
facial
markings
slightly
more
extensive,
the
stripe
at
inner
orbits
ending
in
or
close
to
centre
of
eye-sinus;
clypeus
narrower
and
usually
entirely
yellow.
Antennal
scape
more
extensively
yellow
than
in
the
9
,
but
segments
7
and
following
conspicuously
darker;
antennal
hook
long,
without
hairs
on
inner
side,
partly
reddish.
Band
on
metanotum
often
reduced,
sometimes
lacking.
Red
areas
of
propodeum
and
tergite
2
often
with
small
yellow
spots.
Tarsal
segments
2-5
of
mid
and
hind
legs
brownish
to
black.
Band
on
gastral
tergites
3-6
often
narrower
than
on
3-5
of
9
.
Pubescence
of
volsella
very
dense,
digitus
(fig.
17)
roundly
truncate
at
apex.
Length
to
end
of
gastral
segment
2:
14-18
mm.
The
holotype
is
a
9
from
Gizo
Island,
collected
19
Sept.
1933
by
H.
T.
Pagden
(BM);
all
specimens
recorded
below
are
paratypes.
Solomon
Islands:
Bougaiiiville,
1
a
Naval
Air
Base,
1
May
1945,
G.
E.
Bohan
(CAS),
1
9
Kangu
Hill,
in
secondary
forest,
1945,
J.
Szent-Ivany
(DAPM),
1
a
Kihili
near
Buin,
31
May
1956,
1
a
Simba
Mission,
30
June
1956,
E.
J.
Ford
Jr.
(BISH;
ML).
-
Shor
tl
and,
1
9
Korovo,
29
April
1934,
1
9
1
o'
23
April
1936,
H.
T.
Pagden
(BM;
ML).
-
Vella
Lavella,
1
Liani
Estate,
Dobeli,
23
Sept.
1933,
H.
T.
Pagden
(BM).
-
Ganonga,
1
Koremu
Estate,
16
Sept.
1933,
H.
T.
Pagden
(BM).
-
Gizo,
1
9
29
Sept.
1933,
nest
on
Areca
leaf,
4
9
bred,
emerged
20-23
Oct.
1933,
H.
T.
Pagden
(BM;
1
9
ML);
7
9
3
o'
5-120
m,
16-26
April
and
15-20
July
1964,
J.
&
M.
Sedlacek
(BISH;
2
9
1
ML);
1
a
0-100
m,
Nov.
1970,
N.
L.
H.
Krauss
(BISH).
-Munda,
I
a
N.
L.
H.
Krauss
(BISH).
-Guadalcanal,
1
Berande,
4
Febr.
1934,
on
Antigonon,
1
9
Veisali
-
Tenamba,
28
Aug.
1934,
H.
T.
Pagden
(BM);
2
a
1944,
D.
Elden
Beck
(USNM);
2
9
"1-21",
J.
A.
Kusche,
coll.
W.
M.
Giffard,
1
9
1
Bettikama
R.,
Aug.
1960,
W.
W.
Brandt,
1
9
Gold
Ridge,
600
m,
22
June
1953,
1
9
Honiara,
0-20
m,
18
Jan.
1972,
N.
L.
H.
Krauss
(BISH;
1
9
ML);
3
9
2
a
Tenaru
R.,
Jan.
1945,
G.
E.
Bohart
(CAS;
1
9
1
a'
ML).
-
Tulagi,
1
9
on
Casuarina,
5
Sept.
1933,
1
9
10
Aug.
1934,
"larvae
on
Hibiscus",
no.
1438,
1
a'
on
Antigonon,
6
Sept.
1934,
H.
T.
Pagden
(BM).
-Malaita,
2
9
Su'u,
April
1933,
R.
A.
Lever
(BM;
ML);
1
Baunani,
on
Antigonon,
17
Aug.
1934,
H.
T.
Pagden
(BM).
450
Delta
indosinense
(Van
der
Vecht)
Several
years
after
the
publication
of
this
species,
originally
called
Eumenes
indosinensis
(Van
der
Vecht,
1959:
18),
1
have
had
occasion
to
examine
additional
material
in
the
collection
of
the
British
Museum
of
Natural
History.
It
consists
of
:
1
a
from
Khasia
Hills,
Assam
(96-135),
and
five
specimens
from
Burma,
I
Q
Pegu
Hills,
May
1888,
the
remainder
from
Tenasserim;
1
a
Thaungyin
Valley,
1
May
1893,
1
Ataran
Valley,
May
1891
(now
in
ML),
1
Haundraw
Valley,
April
1895,
1
Q
Mergui,
Sept.
1890.
The
Burmese
specimens
were
all
collected
by
C.
T.
Bingham,
who
confused
this
species
with
the
Philippine
Delta
curvatum
(Saussure).
The
wing
colour
of
this
species,
originally
described
as
"moderately
infuscate",
appears
to
be
variable.
In
the
Q
from
Mergui
the
wings
are
strongly
infuscate
and
approximately
as
dark
as
in
the
insular
species
which
run
to
no.
20
in
the
key
(Van
der
Vecht,
1959:
12).
It
is
therefore
necessary
to
add
in
this
key
under
no.
16:
"in
one
continental
species
varying
from
fusco-hyaline
to
strongly
infuscate".
The
a
from
Ataran
Valley
is
in
this
respect
transitional
between
the
Q
from
Mergui
and
the
other
specimens.
Delta
pagdeni
(Van
der
Vecht)
(figs.
18-23)
This
species
was
described
as
Eumenes
pagdeni
from
4
female
specimens
collected
in
the
Solomon
Islands
Nggela,
Tulagi
and
Guadalcanal
(Van
der
Vecht,
1959:
16,
69).
Since
then
the
following
additional
material
from
these
islands
has
been
examined:
Buk
a:
2
o'
Agricultural
Station,
Dec.
1959,
T.
C.
Maa.
-
Bougainville:
1
9
Togerao,
April
1968,
R.
Straatman.
-
Guadal-
canal:
1
Q
Kiwi
Creek,
Aug.
1944,
H.
E.
Milliron
(all
BISH);
1
0'
June
1944,
L.
J.
Lipovsky,
1
a
1945,
P.
H.
Eschmeier
(UK);
1
9
Tenaru
River,
1945,
G.
E.
Bohart
(CAS);
2
Betikama
River,
Aug.
1960,
W. W.
Brandt,
1
Q
Honiara,
April
1964,
J.
Sedlacek
(BISH).
-
Malaita:
1
Q
Dala,
June
1964,
R.
Straatman
(BISH).
-F1
or
ida:
1
Q
14
Sept.
1927
(AMNH).
The
hitherto
undescribed
cr
is
very
similar
to
the
Q
;
facial
markings
approximately
as
in
fig.
5m
(Van
der
Vecht
1959:
17),
but
black
lateral
margin
of
clypeus
somewhat
narrower,
interantennal
spot
extending
to
lower
margin
of
eye-sinus
and
slightly
constricted
near
middle
of
antennal
sockets;
markings
on
pronotum
varying
from
a
twice
narrowly
interrupted
band
to
some
minute
spots;
lines
on
propodeum
sometimes
interrupted;
spots
on
middle
of
petiole
small
or
absent,
tergite
5
black
or
with
two
small
transverse
spots,
ventral
markings
varying
from
four
spots
on
sternite
2
and
two
on
3
(as
usual
in
9
)
to
only
two
spots
on
sternite
2.
In
both
sexes
from
Buka
and
Bougainville
the
yellow
markings
are
slightly
more
extensive
than
in
those
from
elsewhere.
Details
of
antenna!
apex,
mandible,
volsella
and
aedeagus
are
shown
in
figs.
18-23.
Delta
transmarinum
(Van
der
Vecht)
(figs.
24-28)
Up
to
the
present
this
species,
described
in
the
same
paper
as
D.
pagdeni
(1959:
16,
71),
was
known
only
from
the
type,
a
Q
from
de
Freycinet
Island,
451
N.
W.
Australia,
in
the
British
Museum
(Natural
History).
Additional
material
has
been
provided
by
the
West
Australian
Museum:
1
9
from
Hillside,
Woljulum
(21.47
S,
119.20
E),
collected
12
Oct.
1955
by
A.
Douglas,
and
by
the
Leiden
Museum:
4
specimens
collected
by
Dr.
G.
F.
Mees
in
Kimberley
div.,
W.
Australia,
not
far
from
Mount
House
(17.00
S,
125.30
E):
1
9
Windjana
Gorge,
1
9
1
a
Barnett
Range
near
Manning
Creek,
Aug.
1968,
1
9
Manning
Gorge,
Sept.
1974.
The
9
9
agree
well
with
the
original
description
except
for
some
small
differences
in
colour.
In
the
9
from
Manning
Gorge
the
tegulae
are
entirely
black
and
there
are
two
very
small
spots
near
the
base
of
the
petiole.
The
colour
pattern
of
the
a
is
hardly
different
from
that
of
the
9
.
Mandibles
and
terminal
antennal
segments
of
the
a
(figs.
24,
25)
are
very
similar
to
those
of
D.
arcuatum
(Fabricius),
but
the
stucture
of
the
genitalia
appears
to
confirm
that
this
is
a
different
species.
The
dorsal
margin
of
the
volsellar
digitus
(fig.
26)
is
irregularly
denticulate
and
the
distal
part
of
the
aedeagus
(fig.
27,
28)
is
relatively
longer
and
more
slender
than
in
the
related
species.
Delta
rumphii
(Van
der
Vecht)
This
species
was
hitherto
known
only
from
the
type,
a
a
from
Amboina
(Van
der
Vecht,
1959:
67).
A
a
collected
in
January
1909
by
F.
Muir
at
Piru
on
18
23
22
21
19
-
_120
Figs.
18-23.
Delta
pagdeni
(Van
der
Vecht)
o':
18,
19,
ventral
and
lateral
view
of
antennal
segments
10-13;
20,
left
mandible;
21,
volsella;
22,
23,
lateral
and
ventral
view
of
aedeagus.
452
the
island
of
Ceram
(ex
coll.
Perkins
1942-95,
BM)
is
certainly
conspecific,
but
its
colour
pattern
is
slightly
different:
the
yellow
clypeal
mark
is
not
dilated
downwards
as
in
fig.
5m
(1.
c.:
17)
and
there
are
no
yellow
spots
on
the
mesepisternum.
The
broad
antennal
hook
distinguishes
the
male
of
this
species
from
all
its
known
relatives.
Synonymy
of
Eumenes
atrophicus
(Fabricius)
The
type
of
Vespa
atrophica
Fabricius,
1798,
was
first
examined
by
Schulz
(1912:
86),
who
correctly
placed
the
species
in
the
genus
Eumenes,
but
erroneously
regarded
it
as
identical
with
Eumenes
architectus
Smith,
described
from
Celebes.
In
1958
I
had
an
opportunity
to
redescribe
and
figure
this
specimen
and
suggested
that
the
type
locality
might
be
in
continental
Asia
(Van
der
Vecht,
1958:
235-237).
Since
then
I
have
studied
the
type
of
Eumenes
compressus
Saussure
(property
of
the
Paris
Museum),
a
species
not
recognized
24
27
28
25
sr
it
26
-
..
Figs.
24-28.
Della
transmarinum
(Van
der
Vecht)
:
24,
antennal
segments
10-13;
25,
two
aspects
of
left
mandible;
26,
volsella;
27,
28,
lateral
and
ventral
view
of
aedeagus.
453
since
it
was
described
from
"Probablement
l'Amerique"
(Saussure,
1855,
1875).
It
was
found
to
agree
in
all
details
with
specimens
of
Eumenes
from
Thailand
and
Laos,
which
meanwhile
had
been
identified
as
E.
atrophicus.
Shortly
after,
Eumenes
citreolineatus
Giordani
Soika
(1941:
149),
described
from
Siam,
Hongkong
and
Burma,
proved
to
be
another
synonym
of
Eumenes
atrophicus
(Fabricius).
Eumenes
piriformis
Saussure
This
species
has
not
been
discussed
since
it
was
described
by
de
Saussure
(1862:
177)
from
some
specimens
collected
in
Java
and
Sumatra.
The
lectotype
by
present
designation
is
a
9
,
labelled
"Java,
S.
Muller"
(ML).
The
name
is
a
junior
secondary
homonym
of
Eumenes
pyriformis
auctt.,
originally
described
as
Vespa
pyriformis
by
Fabricius
(1775),
but
at
present
considered
to
belong
to
the
genus
Delta
Saussure
(1855).
Since
the
homonymy
has
been
overlooked
and
the
junior
name
has
not
been
replaced,
the
name
originally
proposed
by
de
Saussure
is
valid.
In
the
Leiden
Museum
Eumenes
piriformis
is
represented
by
14
9
and
7
ce
from
several
localities
in
West
Java
and
1
9
from
Gedangan
in
Central
Java.
The
species
is
easily
distinguished
from
the
closely
related,
commoner
and
probably
more
wide-spread
Eumenes
inconspicuus
Smith
by
the
presence
of
yellow
apical
bands
on
the
gastral
segments
3-5.
Pseudalastor
xanthozonellus
nom.
nov.
Odynerus
xanthozonus
Cameron
(1911:
191),
described
from
S.W.
New
Guinea,
is
a
member
of
the
genus
Pseudalastor
Giordani
Soika
(1962:
65,
131),
hitherto
known
only
from
the
Australian
continent.
The
name
is
a
junior
primary
homonym
of
Odynerus
xanthozonus
Cameron
(1908:
307),
described
from
Bombay,
and
is
herewith
replaced
by
the
name
above.
Besides
the
type
(
,
MA)
I
have
seen
one
female
collected
in
October
1957
at
Kiunga,
Fly
River,
Papua,
by
W.
W.
Brandt
(BISH).This
specimen
agrees
well
with
the
type,
but
the
gastral
bands
are
more
reddish,
a
difference
which
is
perhaps
due
to
the
influence
of
cyanide.
In
the
key
to
Pseudalastor
(l.c.:
132)
this
species
runs
to
P.
concolor
(Saussure)
which
is
known
from
Brisbane,
whereas
a
subspecies
rapax
has
been
described
by
Giordani
Soika
(1977:
122)
from
N.S.
Wales
and
Victoria.
P.
xanthozonellus
differs
from
the
Australian
forms
in
having
only
narrow
yellow
bands
on
tergites
2-5
and
may
provisionally
be
treated
as
a
good
species.
AN
OVERLOOKED
CASE
OF
HOMONYMY
IN
THE
GENUS
C,vphodynerus
VAN
DER
VECHT
In
the
catalogue
of
the
palaearctic
Eumenidae
(Van
der
Vecht
and
Fischer,
1972:
78)
the
authors
have
followed
Bluthgen
(1939:
244),
who
placed
Odynerus
canaliculatus
Saussure,
1855,
in
the
synonymy
of
Odynerus
dimidiatus
Spinola,
1838.
However,
the
latter
name
is
a
primary
junior
homonym
of
Odynerus
dimidiatus
Guerin,
1834,
published
in
Belanger's
"Voyage
aux
lndes
454
Orientales"
1
.
The
correct
name
of
Spinola's
species,
now
the
type
of
Cyphodynerus,
is
therefore
C.
canaliculatus
(Saussure).
It
may
be
noted
here
that,
since
De
Saussure
(1852:
110),
Odynerus
dimidiatus
Guerin
has
been
regarded
as
a
synonym
of
Rhynchium
haemorrhoidale
(Fabricius).
This
is
very
probably
correct,
for
as
far
as
the
descriptions
go,
they
apply
well
to
the
Javanese
form
of
this
common
wasp.
Apparently
both
Fabricius
and
Guerin
described
this
Rhynchium
from
incorrectly
labelled
specimens,
viz,
from
Cape
of
Good
Hope
and
from
Coromandel,
respectively.
The
explanation
may
well
be
that
the
collectors
of
these
wasps
both
spent
at
least
some
months
in
Java,
Banks
in
October-
December
1770
and
Belanger
in
1828
(Van
Steenis-Kruseman,
1950:
34,
48),
and
that
in
those
times
wasps
were
treated
with
less
care
than
butterflies
and
beetles.
Parancistrocerus
luzonicola
nom.
nov.
This
name
is
proposed
for
Odynerus
luzonensis
Schulthess,
a
junior
primary
homonym
of
Odynerus
luzonensis
Rohwer
(1919:
17),
which
is
a
member
of
the
genus
Antepipona
Saussure.
The
species
described
by
Von
Schulthess
(1934:
70)
was
based
on
1
a
1
9
,
collected
in
Luzon
by
Boucher.
It
is
herewith
provisionally
transferred
to
the
genus
Parancistrocerus
Bequaert,
and
the
is
designated
as
the
lectotype.
It
is
apparently
not
rare
in
the
Philippine
Islands.
1
have
seen
specimens
from
Luzon,
Negros,
Leyte,
and
Mindanao
(USNM;
ML;
coll.
Townes).
Antepipona
brunnipes
pocilloides
subspec.
nov.
Very
close
to
subsp.
pocillum
(Saussure)
from
Timor
(see
Van
der
Vecht,
1937:
280),
but
the
thoracic
markings
brighter,
orange-red,
and
as as
rule
each
partly
yellowish;
clypeus
almost
entirely
reddish
yellow,
often
more
or
less
blackish
in
centre;
second
gastral
tergite
more
densely
punctate,
the
interspaces
narrow
and
dull.
In
a
few
specimens
the
second
gastral
tergite
bears
two
reddish
lateral
spots,
about
as
far
from
the
anterior
margin
as
from
the
apical
band.
The
holotype
is
a
9
from
Langgaliru
on
the
Indonesian
island
of
Sumba,
(NMB),
the
specimens
recorded
below
are
paratypes.
Sumba:
93
9
,
96
a',
Bondo
Kodi,
Waimangura,
Rua,
Waikarudi,
Pogobina,
Lokojengo,
Langgaliru,
Baing,
Laluku,
Mau
Marru,
Melolo,
and
Prai
Jawang,
all
collected
by
the
zoologists
of
the
Swiss
Sumba
Expedition
of
1949
(Biihler
and
Sutter,
1951).
No
less
than
23
9
and
6
a
out
of
this
series
are
stylopized;
the
parasites
were
most
numerous
at
Waikarudi
(24
out
of
47
specimens)
and
also
occurred
at
Rua
and
Melolo.
1)
Evidently
Kim
(1970:
804)
refers
to
this
species,
where
he
mentions:
"Odynerus
dimidiatus
Gmelin,
Betang.
Vog.
Ins.
Orient.
p.
5936,
1834"
as
a
synonym
of
Rhynchium
haemorrkoidale
Fabricius".
455
Pareumenes
taiwanus
(Sonan),
comb.
nov.
Montezumia
(Pseudozumia)
taiwana
Sonan
(1937:
14,
15),
described
from
three
localities
in
Taiwan
(Formosa),
is
evidently
not
a
Pseudozumia,
but
a
member
of
the
subgenus
Nortonia
Saussure
of
the
genus
Pareumenes
Saussure.
Ectopioglossa
polita
australensis
(Meade-Waldo)
When
in
1963
1
revised
the
genus
Ectopioglossa
Perkins,
I
was
not
aware
that
the
species
described
as
Eumenes
australensis
by
Meade-Waldo
(1910:
44)
from
Cairns,
Queensland,
also
belongs
to
this
genus.
Examination
of
the
type
in
the
British
Museum
showed
that
it
is
identical
with
the
form
described
by
Perkins
(1912:
119)
from
the
same
locality
as
Ectopioglossa
australensis.
later
treated
by
me
as
a
subspecies
of
Ectopioglossa
polita
(Smith).
The
correct
name
is
therefore
as
written
in
the
heading
of
this
note.
In
the
textbook
"The
Insects
of
Australia"
(1970:
937)
the
name
is
incorrectly
written:
"australiensis".
Ectopioglossa
taiwana
(Sonan),
comb.
nov.
Pareumenes
taiwanus
Sonan
(1938:
69),
described
from
Taiwan,
is
undoubtedly
a
member
of
the
genus
Ectopioglossa
Perkins.
As
a
result
of
the
assignment
of
Montezumia
taiwana
(Sonan,
1937)
to
the
genus
Pareumenes
(see
above),
Pareumenes
taiwanus
Sonan,
1938,
(now
Ectopioglossa
taiwana
(Sonan,
1938),
becomes
a
junior
secondary
homonym
of
Pareumenes
taiwanus
(Sonan,
1937).
Since
these
taxa
are
not
considered
congeneric,
however,
the
junior
name
is
not
to
be
rejected
(article
59,
Bull.
zool.
Nomencl.
31
(2):83,
1974).
lschnocoelia
ecclesiastica
(Rayment),
comb.
nov.
In
his
revision
of
the
Australian
"Discoeliinae"
(correctly
Zethinae)
Giordani
Soika
(1969)
overlooked
the
existence
of
a
species
described
as
Discoelius
ecclesiasticus
by
T.
Rayment
(1954)
in
a
paper
with
the
fascinating
title
"The
trail
of
the
running
postman".
The
figures
accompanying
Rayment's
account
of
the
bionomics
of
this
wasp
leave
no
doubt
that
it
is
a
member
of
the
genus
lschnocoelia
Perkins.
The
two-celled
nest
was
found
in
a
sandy
bank;
the
cells
were
separated
by
a
plug
made
from
masticated
leaf
cuttings
from
Kennedya
prostrata
R.
B.
("the
running
postman");
the
larval
food
consisted
of
Geometrid
caterpillars.
It
seems
possible
that
1.
ecclesiastica
will
prove
to
be
a
synonym
of
a
previously
described
species.
ORIENTAL
SPECIES
OF
Alastor
LEPELETIER
The
Eumenid
genus
A/astor,
easily
recognizable
by
the
petiolate
second
submarginal
cell
and
the
absence
of
parategulae,
is
well
represented
in
the
palaearctic
region
and
in
Southern
Africa.
The
former
area
harbours
about
25
species,
including
4
species
inhabiting
Europe
(mainly
the
Southern
part),
the
others
occurring
in
Northern
Africa
and
Southwest
Asia.
Nearly
30
species
have
been
described,
mainly
by
Giordani
Soika
(1935,
1942
and
1950),
from
the
456
29
33
O
0 0
30
31
32
34
35
Ethiopian
region,
where
the
genus
appears
to
be
restricted
to
the
area
south
of
the
18th
degree
of
latitude.
Up
to
the
present
only
two
A/astor-species
have
been
recorded
from
the
Oriental
region,
viz.
A.
variolosus
Bingham
(1897),
described
from
Ceylon,
and
A.
punjabensis
Dutt
(1922),
described
from
Punjab,
India.
Of
both
species
only
the
male
sex
is
known.
In
the
extensive
Eumenid
collections
made
in
recent
years
by
Dr.
Karl
V.
Krombein
e.a.
as
part
of
the
project
"Biosystematic
Studies
of
the
Insects
of
Ceylon",
and
kindly
sent
to
me
for
study,
the
genus
A/astor
is
represented
by
two
species
which
are
both
new
to
science.
A
few
specimens
of
one
of
these
species
have
been
obtained
from
other
sources,
but
unfortunately
no
second
specimen
of
A.
variolosus
has
been
found
so
far.
For
the
following
key
the
notes
on
A.
punjabensis
have
been
taken
from
the
original
description;
the
type
of
A.
variolosus
was
kindly
made
available
for
study
by
the
authorities
of
the
British
Museum
(Natural
History).
Figs.
29-35.
A/astor
variolosus
Bingham
a,
type:
29,
frontal
view
of
head;
30,
lateral
view
of
antenna;
31,
ventral
view
of
antenna!
segments
1-5;
32,
anterior
part
of
thorax;
33,
dorsal
view
of
propodeum;
34,
part
of
fore
wing;
35,
lateral
view
of
tip
of
propodcum
and
gastral
segments
1-3.
457
KEY
TO
ORIENTAL
SPECIES
OF
Alastor
I.
Clypeus
slightly
punctured,
incised
at
apex.
Scutellum
sparsely
punctured
with
median
longitudinal
impression
on
apical
half.
Tegula
smooth
and
shining
(impunctate?).
Yellow
markings
of
cf
extensive:
base
of
mandibles,
labrum,
clypeus,
eye-sinus,
spot
on
temple,
sides
of
pronotum
not
reaching
posterior
angles,
mark
on
lateral
angles
of
propodeum,
apical
bands
on
gastral
segments
1-4,
and
legs
except
for
coxae
and
femora.
-
Akalgarh,
Punjab,
coll.
Dutt
(
9
unknown)
punjabensis
Dutt
Clypeus
and
scutellum
coarsely
and
more
or
less
densely
punctured;
apex
of
clypeus
truncate
or
shallowly
emarginate.
Yellow
markings
less
extensive:
temples,
scutellum,
propodcum
and
gastral
tergite
4
unmarked,
pronotum
at
most
with
narrow
band
or
small
spots
at
anterior
margin;
tibiae
at
least
partly
black
2
2.
Sides
of
propodeum
angularly
projecting
in
front
of
the
apical
tooth,
which
is
short
and
not
distinctly
curved
upwards
(fig.
40).
Humeral
angles
of
pronotum
strongly
projecting
(fig.
39).
Eye-sinus
black.
-
Sri
Lanka
abditus
spec.
nov.
Sides
of
propodeum
rounded
in
front
of
the
apical
tooth,
which
is
distinctly
curved
upwards
(fig.
49).
Humeral
angles
of
pronotum
not
or
hardly
projecting
(figs.
32,
48).
Eye-sinus
with
yellow
spot
3
3.
Antenna
rather
slender,
in
dorsal
aspect
segment
3
longer
than
4
(fig.
30).
Apex
of
clypeus
shallowly
emarginate
(fig.
29).
Dorsal
surface
of
tergite
2
on
each
side
with
oblique
shallow
impression,
outline
in
profile
beyond
the
basal
constriction
almost
straight
(fig.
35).
Mandible
with
yellow
spot;
anterior
margin
of
pronotum
with
interrupted
band;
tergites
I
and
2
with
narrow
apical
band,
3
without
yellow
mark.
-
Sri
Lanka.
(
9
unknown)
...
varialosus
Bingham
Antenna
thicker,
segments
3
and
4
about
equally
long.
Dorsal
surface
of
tergite
2
with
transverse
impression
which
is
well
visible
in
profile
(fig.
50).
Mandible
not
marked
with
yellow;
pronotum
with
transverse
spot
near
humeral
angle;
tergites
I
and
2
with
broad
apical
yellow
band,
3
with
abbreviated
band.
-
S.
India
and
Sri
Lanka
silica:us
spec.
nov.
Alastor
variolosus
Bingham
(figs.
29-35)
Bingham
(1897:
374,
375)
figured
and
described
the
male
of
this
species
from
"Trincomali,
Ceylon".
According
to
a
label
in
his
handwriting,
the
type
(BM,
no.
18.704)
came
from
the
Bignell
collection
and
had
been
caught
by
Col.
Yerbury.
It
seems
possible
that
Bingham,
who
never
mentioned
the
number
of
specimens
studied,
may
have
seen
more
material,
for
the
description
of
the
colour
pattern
does
not
agree
in
all
respects
with
that
of
the
type.
The
mandible
of
the
latter
has
an
irregular
yellow
spot,
not
mentioned
by
Bingham,
the
yellow
mark
on
the
clypeus
covers
slightly
more
than
the
basal
half
(B.:
clypeus
yellow),
the
pronotum
has
an
interrupted,
narrow,
yellow
band
at
anterior
margin
(fig.
32)
(B.:
a
spot
on
each
side
of
the
middle
posteriorly)
and
there
are
no
markings
on
the
metanotum
(B.:
lateral
angles
yellow).
Unfortunately
the
extensive
wasp
collections
made
in
Sri
Lanka
in
recent
years
do
not
contain
this
species.
Alastor
abditus
spec.
nov.
(figs.
36-44)
9
-
Head
(fig.
36)
subcircular,
clypeus
broad,
distinctly
emarginate
anteriorly;
fourth
tooth
of
mandible
(counted
from
apex)
emarginate;
gena
wide,
dilated
below,
bordered
by
occipital
carina
which
runs
down
to
near
the
hypostomal
margin,
then
changes
its
course
with
a
rounded
angle
and
runs
close
to
the
hypostomal
margin
to
the
mandible
base;
the
carina
is
only
very
weakly
indicated
behind
the
vertex.
458
Pronotum
with
projecting
angles,
the
transverse
carina
dorsally
obliterated
by
coarse
puncturation.
Tegula
large,
smooth,
with
only
a
few
shallow
punctures.
Metanotum
with
very
narrow,
depressed,
dorsal
surface,
separated
by
a
narrow
ridge
from
the
much
larger,
vertical,
posterior
part.
Triangular
area
at
base
of
propodeum
only
slightly
longer
than
wide
at
base
(shortened
in
fig.
40
which
shows
dorsal
aspect).
Second
gastral
tergite
with
three
weak
convexities,
one
in
the
middle,
with
its
top
not
far
from
the
constricted
base,
and
a
less
striking
one
on
each
side
of
the
middle
in
front
of
the
somewhat
depressed,
pale
yellow,
apical
margin.
Sternite
of
gastral
segment
2
much
longer
than
tergite
(fig.
42),
apical
margin
arcuate.
37
0
36
41
39
44
43
40
_
42
Figs.
36-44.
Alastor
abdilus
spec.
nov.:
36,
9,
frontal
view
of
head;
37,
left
mandible;
38,
antenna
of
9
(ventral
view)
and
a
(lateral
view);
39,
9,
anterior
part
of
thorax
with
sample
of
puncturation;
40,
Q,
dorsal
view
of
metanotum
and
propodeum;
41,
9,
wings;
42,
9
,
gastral
segments
1
and
2;
43,
a,
lateral
and
ventral
view
of
aedeagus;
44,
a,
paramere
and
volsella.
38
459
Body
generally
with
coarse
and
dense
puncturation
(sample
in
fig.
39);
anterior,
vertical,
surface
of
pronotum
mainly
polished;
posterior
face
of
metanotum
with
only
a
row
of
punctures
near
dorsal
margin;
dorsal
surface
of
propodeum
rather
sparsely
punctate,
the
basal
triangle
impunctate,
but
with
fine
coriaceous
sculpture;
punctures
of
gastral
tergite
2,
particularly
in
the
central
part,
smaller
and
sparser
than
on
tergites
1
and
3.
Black,
legs
black
or
partly
reddish;
pale
yellow:
line
on
antennal
scape,
small
transverse
spot
on
pronotum
near
humeral
angle,
two
spots
on
tegula
(fig.
39),
line
on
outer
side
of
fore
and
mid
tibia,
apical
band
on
tergites
1-3
(on
3
abbreviated
laterally)
and
on
sternite
2,
the
bands
on
segment
2
slightly
wider
than
the
others.
Length
to
end
of
gastral
tergite
2:
8-9
mm.
-
Very
similar
to
9
,
but
slightly
smaller.
Mandible
with
large
proximal
tooth
(fig.
37);
antenna
as
figured,
clypeus
with
yellow
mark
on
basal
third,
yellow
line
also
on
hind
tibia.
Genitalia
as
figured
(figs.
43,
44).
Lenght
to
end
of
gastral
tergite
2:
7-8
mm.
The
holotype
is
a
at
collected
15
April
1970
near
the
town
of
Anuradhapura
by
Dr.
R.
Simon
Thomas
(ML);
the
specimens
recorded
below
are
paratypes.
Sri
Lanka:
1
9
,
Suriyawewa
Road,
Nov.
1908
(Colombo
Museum);
1
o
Anuradhapura
distr.,
Hunuwilagama,
near
Wilpattu,
200
ft,
28
Oct.
3
Nov.
1976,
G.
F.
Hevel
e.a.
(USNM)
(tegula
without
anterior
spot);
1
9
Trincomalee
distr.,
China
Bay,
0-30
m,
8-11
Oct.
1977,
K.
V.
Krombein
e.a.
(USNM).
Alastor
suleatus
spec.
nov.
(figs.
45-51)
9
-
Slightly
smaller
and
more
slender
than
A.
abditus.
Head
(fig.
45)
subcircular,
clypeus
truncate
anteriorly;
mandible
with
large
proximal
tooth
(fig.
46);
gena
as
in
A.
abditus;
antennal
segment
3
slightly
shorter
than
4
and
about
as
long
as
maximum
width.
Pronotal
carina
well
developed,
but
obsolete
in
middle
third;
humeral
angles
not
projecting.
Tegula
with
coarsely
punctate
area
(fig.
48).
Metanotum
as
in
A.
abditus.
Sides
of
propodeum
rounded,
the
subapical
tooth
distinctly
curved
up-
and
outwards;
the
well
defined,
smooth,
median
area
much
longer
than
wide.
Second
gastral
tergite
with
shallow,
transverse,
impression
in
front
of
the
middle,
distinctly
visible
in
lateral
view
(fig.
50);
anterior
part
weakly
convex,
posterior
part
slightly
swollen
on
each
side
of
the
middle.
Puncturation
mainly
as
in
A.
abditus,
but
impunctate
area
of
posterior
surface
of
metanotum
smaller,
and
tergite
2
almost
as
closely
punctate
as
tergites
1
and
3.
Body
black;
antenna
and
legs
partly
brownish;
pale
yellow:
spot
in
eye-
emargination,
small
transverse
spot
near
humeral
angle,
two
spots
on
tegula,
line
on
outer
side
of
all
tibiae,
apical
band
on
tergites
1-3
and
sternite 2,
the
band
on
tergite
2
twice
emarginate
anteriorly,
on
tergite
3
much
abbreviated.
Lenght
to
end
of
gastral
tergite
2:
6.5-7.5
mm.
460
o
-
Very
similar
to
the
9
,
with
exactly
the
same
colour
pattern.
Proximal
tooth
of
mandible
slightly
larger;
antenna
and
aedeagus
as
figured;
paramere
and
volsella
almost
as
in
A.
abditus,
the
digitus
slightly
narrower.
Length
to
end
of
gastral
tergite
2:
6-7
mm.
The
holotype
is
a
o•
from
Sri
Lanka,
Hambantota
district,
Tissamaharama,
collected
25
October
1953
by
Dr.
F.
Keiser
(NMB);
the
specimens
recorded
below
are
paratypes.
Sri
Lanka:
Anuradhapura
distr.,
1
ce
Hunuwilagama,
near
Wilpattu,
200
ft,
28
Oct.
3
Nov.
1976,
G.
F.
Hevel
e.a.
(USNM);
1
9
4
o'
Padaviya
archeological
site,
60
m,
11-14
Oct.
1977,
K.
V.
Krombein
e.a.
(USNM,
ML,
Colombo
Museum).
-
Trincomalee
distr.,
1
9
Trincomalee,
China
Bay,
0-30
m,
8-11
Oct.
1977,
K.
V.
Krombein
e.a.
(USNM).
Southern
India:
Putuchcheri
State,
5
9
1
cr
Karikal,
Sept.
Oct.
1962,
Aug.
1964,
P.
Susai
Nathan
(MA,
ML).
45
48
46
51
47
49
Figs.
45-51.
Alastor
sulcatus
spec.
nov.:
45,
9
,
frontal
view
of
head:
46,
left
mandible
of
9
and
a;
47,
antenna
of
9
and
a;
48,
a,
anterior
part
of
thorax,
with
samples
of
puncturation
of
scutum
and
left
tegula;
49,
a,
dorsal
view
of
metanotum
and
propodeum;
50,
a,
lateral
view
of
tip
of
propodeum
and
of
gastral
segments
1-3;
51,
a,
lateral
and
ventral
view
of
aedeagus.
461
Relationships
of
Oriental
Alastor.
The
three
Oriental
species
discussed
above
differ
in
various
respects
from
several
palaearctic
Alastor
known
to
me,
but
they
are
very
similar
to
the
members
of
a
group
inhabiting
Southern
Africa.
This
group
may
be
called
the
braunsi-group,
after
the
first
described
African
species
(Meade-Waldo,
1913).
It
contains
the
first
seven
species
of
Giordani
Soika's
key
(1942)
and
three
species
described
by
this
author
in
1950:
A.
conicus,
mandibularis
and
persimilis.
Thanks
to
the
cooperation
of
Dr.
Giordani
Soika
I
could
compare
three
species
of
this
group,
A.
mandibularis
G.S.,
persimilis
G.S.,
and
stevensoni
Schulthess,
with
the
Oriental
forms.
They
proved
to
agree
in
several
characters,
including
the
shape
of
the
genae
(broad
and
angular
below),
the
course
of
the
occipital
carina
(in
lower
part
very
close
to
hypostomal
margin),
the
large
and
posteriorly
broadly
rounded
tegulae,
and
the
shape
of
metanotum
and
the
second
gastral
tergite
and
sternite.
Also
the
colour
pattern
of
gastral
segments
1-3
of
the
available
African
species
is
similar
to
that
of
A.
abditus
and
A.
sulcatus.
If
the
braunsi-group
will
indeed
prove
to
be
restricted
to
Southern
Africa,
Southern
India
and
Sri
Lanka,
the
question
arises
how
to
explain
this
remarkable
discontinuous
distribution.
Could
the
inhabitants
of
the
intermediate
areas
have
become
extinct
more
or
less
recently,
or
will
it
be
possible
to
find
support
for
the
idea
that
the
Oriental
species
may
be
Gondwana
relicts?
Evidently
the
available
data
are
so
incomplete
that
any
reply
to
these
questions
would
be
premature,
but
the
problem
appears
to
be
important
enough
to
be
brought
to
the
notice
of
entomologists
interested
in
biogeography.
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