A key to the Neotropical species of the Enicospilus ramidulus species-group (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Ophioninae), with the description of a new Brazilian species


Lima, A.; Kumagai, A.F.; Jacobi, C.M.

Zootaxa 3409 (6 Aug): 63-68

2012


A key to the Neotropical species of the Enicospilus ramidulus species-group is provided, with the exception of Galapagos Islands species. A total of 22 specimens of E. purgatus (Say) were examined and its known distribution (Southern Brazil) extended to the states of Bahia and Amazonas, in Northeastern and Northern Brazil, respectively. A new species, Enicospilus diae Lima&Kumagai sp. n., is described from Southeastern Brazil.

Zootaxa
3409:
63-68
(2012)
ISSN
1175-5326
(print
edition)
www.mapress.com/zootaxa/
Article
ZOOTAXA
Copyright
2012
Magnolia
Press
ISSN
1175-5334
(online
edition)
A
key
to
the
Neotropical
species
of
the
Enicospilus
ramidulus
species
-group
(Hymenoptera:
Ichneumonidae:
Ophioninae),
with
the
description
of
a
new
Brazilian
species
ALESSANDRO
RODRIGUES
LIMA',
CLAUDIA
MARIA
JACOBI'
&
ALICE
FUMI
KUMAGAI
3
1
Departamento
de
Zoologia,
Institute
de
Ciencias
Biologicas,
Universidade
Federal
de
Minas
Gerais,
Brazil.
E-mail:
biolimaufmg@yahoo.com.br
2
Departamento
de
Biologia
Geral,
Institute
de
Ciencias
Biologicas,
Universidade
Federal
de
Minas
Gerais,
Brazil.
E-mail:
jacobi@icb.ufing.br
3
Departamento
de
Zoologia,
Institute
de
Ciencias
Biologicas,
Universidade
Federal
de
Minas
Gerais,
Brazil.
E-mail:
acfk@icb.ufmg.br
Abstract
A
key
to
the
Neotropical
species
of
the
Enicospilus
ramidulus
species
-group
is
provided,
with
the
exception
of
Galapagos
Islands
species.
A
total
of
22
specimens
of
E.
purgatus
(Say)
were
examined
and
its
known
distribution
(Southern
Brazil)
extended
to
the
states
of
Bahia
and
Amazonas,
in
Northeastern
and
Northern
Brazil,
respectively.
A
new
species,
Enic-
ospilus
diae
Lima
&
Kumagai
sp.
n.,
is
described
from
Southeastern
Brazil.
Key
words:
parasitoids,
Malaise
trap,
taxonomy
Resumen
En
el
presente
trabajo
ofrecemos
una
clave
para
las
especies
neotropicales
del
grupo
Enicospilus
ramidulus,
con
excepci6n
de
aquellas
de
las
Islas
Galapagos.
Un
total
de
22
especimenes
de
E.
purgatus
(Say)
fueron
examinados,
extendiendo
su
distribucion
conocida
(sur
de
Brasil)
a
los
estados
de
Bahia
y
Amazonas,
en
las
regiones
noreste
y
norte
de
Brasil,
respec-
tivamente.
Se
describe
una
nueva
especie
del
sudeste
de
Brasil,
Enicospilus
diae
Lima
&
Kumagai
sp.
n.
Palabras
clave:
parasitoides,
trampa
Malaise,
taxonomia
Introduction
Enicospilus
Stephens
is
the
largest
genus
in
Ophioninae,
with
almost
700
described
species
(Yu
et
al.
2012).
According
to
Gauld
(1988),
the
most
easily
recognizable
feature
of
Enicospilus
is
a
sinuous
fore
wing
vein
Rs+2r,
usually
with
a
large
hairless
area
beneath
it
in
the
discosubmarginal
cell,
which
often
bears
pigmented
sclerites
(Figs
2,
4A).
This
cosmopolitan
genus,
of
which
most
species
occur
in
the
tropics
(Gauld,
1985),
is
divided
into
a
great
number
of
species
-groups.
A
few
of
these
are
endemic
to
a
single
zoogeographic
area
(Gauld,
1985),
while
others
occur
in
wider
areas.
Gauld
(1988)
divided
the
Mesoamerican
species
of
Enicospilus
among
five
species
-
groups:
E.
undulatus,
E.
columbianus,
E.
trilineatus,
E.
dispilus
and
E.
ramidulus.
Members
of
the
latter,
a
cosmopolitan
group,
are
easily
recognizable
by
their
long
slender
mandibles
with
a
diagonal
groove
extending
from
the
upper
corner
to
the
base
of
the
teeth
(Gauld,
1988).
This
group
is
represented
in
the
Neotropical
region
by
eight
species.
Among
them,
E.
donor,
E.
stylus,
E.
vidus
and
E.
ditor
were
all
described
by
Gauld
and
Carter
(1983),
and
are
endemic
to
the
Galapagos
Islands;
E.
doylei
Gauld,
1988
was
found
in
USA,
Bermuda,
Bahamas
and
Nicaragua;
E.
neotropicus
Hooker,
1912
was
recorded
from
USA,
Cuba,
Dominican
Republic,
Jamaica,
and
Chile;
E.
cheoi
Fernandez-Triana,
2005
is
endemic
to
Cuba;
and
E.
purgatus
(Say,
1835),
with
the
widest
distribution,
occurs
from
Canada
to
Argentina,
and
is
the
only
one
recorded
in
Brazil.
Accepted
by
J.T.
Jennings:
15
Jun.
2012;
published:
6
Aug.
2012
63
Here
we
extend
the
known
distribution
of
E.
purgatus,
provide
a
key
to
the
Neotropical
species
of
the
Enicospilus
ramidulus
species
-group,
and
describe
a
new
Brazilian
species
of
the
group.
Methods
Data
on
the
species
not
recorded
in
Brazil
were
obtained
from
previous
descriptions
and
illustrations
(Gauld,
1988;
Fernandez-Triana,
2005).
For
the
other
species,
we
examined
specimens
from
the
following
Brazilian
collections:
Ichneumonidae
in
ColecOes
Taxonomicas
da
Universidade
Federal
de
Minas
Gerais
(UFMG),
Colecao
de
Entomo-
logic
da
Universidade
Federal
de
Lavras
(UFLA),
and
Colecao
de Invertebrados
do
Instituto
Nacional
de
Pesquisas
da
Amazonia
(INPA).
Because
the
Galapagos
Islands
species
are
endemic
and
already
well
studied
(Gauld
and
Carter,
1983),
they
are
not
considered
in
this
work.
The
morphological
terminology
follows
Gauld
(1988),
including
the
following
indices
(Fig.
1A
—B)
and
their
abbreviations:
Alar
Index
(AI),
Cubital
Index
(CI),
Intercubital
Index
(ICI),
Second
Discoidal
Index
(SDI)
and
Frontal
Index
(FI).
Original
drawings
were
made
using
a
camera
lucida.
When
describing
the
material
examined
we
provide
the
exact
information
contained
on
the
specimens
labels,
as
well
as
their
collection
name
and,
for
the
UFMG
specimens,
their
record
numbers
in
square
brackets.
These
numbers
correspond
to
the
specimen
identification
in
the
Ichneumonidae
collection
database
(curator
A.
F.
Kuma-
gai),
UFMG.
M+eu
410
To
ulus
cu
-a
Rs&M
Culb
G
1m-ou
Cula
Rs+2r
I
C
2m
-cu
3rs-m
S
FIGURE
1.
A—Ophioninae
fore
wing
labeled
to
show
veins
and
points
used
to
measure
wing
indices.
Alar
Index
(AI)
=
CD/
AB;
Cubital
Index
(CI)
=
HF/FG;
Intercubital
Index
(ICI)
=
AB/BC;
and
Second
Discoidal
Index
(SDI)
= EF/HI.
B—Ophioni-
nae
head,
Frontal
Index
(FI)
=
X/W.
X
—Maximum
diameter
of
the
median
ocellus;
W
—distance
between
eyes.
Results
Enicospilus
purgatus
(Say,
1835)
(Fig.
2C)
This
species
is
known
to
occur
from
Canada
to
Argentina,
throughout
quite
distinct
biomes.
Different
species
could
be
revealed
in
a
more
detailed
study,
however
this
is
not
the
scope
of
this
work.
As
recognized,
E.
purgatus
was
recorded
in
Brazil
from
the
Southern
states
of
Parana
and
Santa
Catarina
(Gauld,
1988)
and
the
Southeastern
states
of
Espirito
Santo,
Minas
Gerais,
and
Rio
de
Janeiro
(De
Santis,
1980).
Its
distribution
is
here
extended
to
the
states
of
Bahia
and
Amazonas,
in
Northeastern
and
Northern
Brazil,
respectively.
Material
examined.
(21y,
1,3)
Brasil:
Amazonas:
Novo
Aripuana,
Floresta
Umida,
05°15'53"S
60°07'08"W,
luz
mista
+
BLB.
2Y,
IX.2004,
Henriques
Silva
&
Pena
Leg.
(INPA).
Bahia:
Curaea,
8°59'58"S
39°54'48"W
(Bandeja-luz).
2
y,
06.V.2011,
D.
Franca
col.
(UFMG)
[2986,
2987].
Minas
Gerais:
Nova
Portei-
rinha,
ParaguassU-Mogno
(Arm.
luminosa).
1y,
04-05.V.2011,
A.
C.
Ferreira
da
Costa
col.
(UFMG)
[2988].
64
Zootaxa
3409
©
2012
Magnolia
Press
LIMA
ET
AL.
Boqueirao,
1(3,
20.V.2005,
R.
L.
Tanque
col.
(UFLA).
Marlieria,
Parque
Estadual
do
Rio
Doce,
M.
A.
V.
D'Andretta
col.:
1
y,
01-07.XII.1997
(UFMG)
[2983];
1
y,
12-18.VIII.1978
(UFMG)
[2982];
1
y,
14-23.IX.1980
(UFMG)
[2984];
1
y,
20-26.X.1980
(UFMG)
[2981].
Sao
Gonealo
do
Rio
Abaixo,
Estacao
Ambiental/Peti,
Cemig,
1
y,
14-16.V.2010,
A.
F.
Kumagai
col.
(UFMG)
[2985].
Lavras:
1y,
07.IV.2001,
D.
C.
Romualdo
col.
(UFLA);
1
y,
20.XI.2002,
F.
H.
Ishikawa
col.
(UFLA).
Parana:
Umuarama,
Estrada
Vermelha,
A.
F.
Yamamoto
col.
(UFMG):
1y,
29.VI-05.VII.1980
[3063];
1y,
13-19.VII.1980
[3057];
1y,
24-30.VIII.1980
[3056];
07-13.IX.1980
[3059];
1y,
28.IX-04.X.1980
[3062];
1y,
05-11.X.1980
[3061];
2Y,
21-26.XII.1980
[3058,
3060].
A
C
FIGURE
2.
Discosubmarginal
cells
on
fore
wing
of
Enicospilus
(A
—modified
from
Fernandez-Triana,
2005;
B,
C,
D
—modi-
fied
from
Gauld,
1988).
The
grey
area
represents
the
pilose
portion
of
the
cell.
A
—E.
cheoi;
B
—E.
neotropicus;
C
—E.
purga-
tus;
D
—E.
doylei.
Enicospilus
diae
Lima
&
Kumagai
sp.
n.
(Figs
3-4)
Type
locality.
Brazil,
Minas
Gerais,
Belo
Horizonte.
Campus
of
the
Universidade
Federal
de
Minas
Gerais.
Geo-
graphic
coordinates
UTM
23K
0607592/7802025,
842m.
Diagnosis.
Enicospilus
diae
can
be
recognized
by
the
following
combination
of
characters:
the
upper
tooth
just
0.3
times
longer
than
the
lower
one;
the
epicnemial
carina
resembling
a
shield,
curved
on
the
epicnemium
(Fig.
4B),
following
the
posterior
border
of
prosternum,
disappearing
behind
the
fore
coxa;
and
the
fore
wing
with
the
central
sclerite
very
small
and
weakly
pigmented
(Fig.
4A).
Description
(based
on
holotype).
Female.
Mandibles
with
abruptly
-narrowed
base,
parallel
-sided
distally,
twisted
about
10°,
with
upper
tooth
subcylindrical,
0.3
times
longer
than
the
lower;
outer
mandibular
surface
with
an
impressed
hirsute
groove
running
from
near
upper
proximal
corner
to
base
of
teeth.
Labrum
0.2
times
as
long
as
wide.
Malar
space
0.35
times
as
long
as
basal
mandibular
width.
Clypeus
in
lateral
view
convex,
its
margin
blunt,
1.45
times
as
broad
as
long.
Face
1.25
times
as
broad
as
long,
centrally
coarsely
punctate.
Genae
rounded
when
head
is
observed
in
dorsal
view.
Posterior
ocellus
almost
touching
eye.
FI
=
53%.
Occipital
carina
mediodorsally
complete,
joining
hypostomal
carina
about
0.9
times
basal
mandibular
width
distant
from
mandible.
Antennae
long
and
slender
with
65
fl
agellomeres;
twentieth
fl
agellomere
2.15
times
as
long
as
broad.
ENICOSPILUS
RAMIDULUS
SPECIES
-GROUP
Zootaxa
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2012
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65
FIGURE
3.
Enicospilus
diae
sp.
n.
Holotype
female.
Lateral
view
of
the
specimen.
B
FIGURE
4
Enicospilus
diae
sp.
n.
A
—Fore
wing;
B
—lateral
view
of
thorax,
the
arrow
indicates
the
epicnemial
carina;
C
—lateral
view
of
apex
of
female
metasoma.
66
Zootaxa
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2012
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LIMA
ET
AL.
Mesoscutum
polished,
closely
punctate,
evenly
rounded
in
lateral
view;
notauli
weak
but
discernible.
Mesopleuron
polished,
the
upper
part
punctate
to
striate,
lower
part
puncto-striate.
Epicnemial
carina
resembling
a
shield,
curved
on
epicnemium
(Fig.
4B),
following
posterior
border
of
prosternum,
disappearing
behind
fore
coxa.
Scutellum
1.25
times
as
long
as
anterior
width,
convex
in
lateral
view,
laterally
carinate
along
entire
length,
shal-
lowly
punctate.
Metapleuron
convex,
diagonally
striate.
Submetapleural
carina
with
anterior
portion
weakly
broad-
ened.
Posterior
transverse
carina
of
mesosternum
complete.
Propodeum
in
lateral
view
evenly
rounded;
anterior
transverse
carina
complete;
posterior
transverse
carina
absent;
anterior
area
rugoso-striate,
as
long
as
spiracular
area;
posterior
area
strongly
wrinkled
to
reticulate,
with
wrinkles
resembling
parts
of
longitudinal
and
posterior
transverse
carinae;
lateral
longitudinal
carina
complete,
joined
to
spiracular
margin
by
short
carina.
Fore
wing
length
15.84
mm;
AI
=
0.73;
CI
=
0.35;
ICI
=
0.62;
SDI
=
1.24;
cu
-a
reaching
M+Cu
basad
of
Rs&M
by
0.3
times
its
own
length.
Pilosity
on
basal
area
of
marginal
cell
slightly
sparser
than
on
central
area.
Dis-
cosubmarginal
cell
(Fig.
4A)
with
proximal
sclerite
subtriangular;
central
sclerite
weakly
pigmented,
irregularly
shaped,
0.6
times
as
long
as
distal
sclerite;
distal
sclerite
not
confluent
with
proximal,
distally
bordering
margin
of
fenestra.
First
subdiscal
cell
with
posterior
0.3
and
proximal
0.2
glabrous,
with
distal
end
hirsute.
Hind
wing
with
8
hamuli
on
R1;
first
abscissa
of
Rs
more
or
less
straight,
second
abscissa
straight.
Middle
leg
with
longer
tibial
spur
1.38
times
as
long
as
shorter
one.
On
hind
leg,
coxa
in
lateral
view
1.8
times
as
long
as
wide;
trochantellus
dorsally
0.26
times
as
long
as
broad;
fourth
tarsomere
2.25
times
as
long
as
broad.
Claws
long,
bearing
close,
short
pectinae.
Metasoma
long
and
slender;
tergite
2
in
lateral
view
6.3
times
as
long
as
posterior
width,
laterotergite
folded
beneath
tergite,
thyridium
elliptical,
its
distance
to
anterior
margin
of
tergite
3.5
times
its
length.
Ovipositor
straight
and
slender
(Fig.
4C).
Body
brownish;
head,
antenna,
tibiae
and
tarsi
yellowish
-brown;
distal
half
of
tergite
3
and
tergites
4
to
8
blackish
-brown;
wings
hyaline.
Variation.
The
notauli
are
more
strongly
marked
than
normal
in
some
specimens.
The
anterior
transverse
carina
of
the
propodeum
can
be
weak
laterally.
In
some
specimens,
the
propodeal
wrinkles
resemble
longitudinal
carinae
or
parts
of
the
posterior
transverse
carina.
The
wrinkles
can
also
give
a
strongly
reticulate
appearance
to
the
propodeum.
Ranges
for
some
features
varying
among
the
observed
specimens
are:
FI
=
53%-60%;
number
of
fl
agellar
seg-
ments
=
65-70;
fore
wing
length
=
13.8mm-16.1
mm;
AI
=
0.63-0.80;
CI
=
0.32-0.39;
ICI
=
0.62-0.87;
SDI
=
1.2-1.36;
number
of
hamuli
on
hind
wing
R1
vein
=
8-9,
with
some
specimens
with
8
hamuli
on
one
wing
and
9
on
the
other.
Male
with
gonosquama
apically
rounded
and
tarsal
claws
more
closely
pectinate
than
those
of
female.
Etymology.
This
species
is
named
in
honor
of
entomologist
Priscila
G.
Dias,
in
recognition
of
her
outstanding
work
towards
the
improvement
of
the
UFMG
insect
collection.
Distribution.
Enicospilus
diae
is
only
known
to
occur
in
the
state
of
Minas
Gerais,
Southeastern
Brazil,
in
the
municipalities
of
Sao
Goncalo
do
Rio
Abaixo,
Belo
Horizonte,
Lavras,
and
Barroso.
Material
examined.
Holotype
y.
Brasil,
Minas
Gerais:
Belo
Horizonte,
Campus
UFMG,
01.XII.2000,
A.
E
Kumagai
col
(UFMG)
[2989].
Paratypes
(30Y,
40(3)
Brasil,
Minas
Gerais:
Sao
Gonealo
do
Rio
Abaixo,
Estacao
Ambiental/Peti,
Cemig:
1y,
18-25.X.2002,
A.
E
Kumagai
col.
(UFMG)
[3065].
1y,
14.XII.2007,
A.
F.
Kumagai
&
P.
G.
Dias
col.
(UFMG)
[3066].
Belo
Horizonte,
Campus
UFMG,
A.
F.
Kumagai
col.
(UFMG)
[2990
-
3055]:
1y,
1(3,
24-30.IX.1991;
1y,
3(3,
1-7.X.1991;
1(3,
8-14.X.1991;
2(3,
15-21.X.1991;
2Y,
2(3,
22-28.X.1991;
4Y,
2(3,
29.X-4.XI.1991;
2Y,
4(3,
5-11.XI.1991;
3Y,
1(3,
12-18.XI.1991;
1y,
19-25.XI.1991;
3Y,
26.XI-2.XII.1991;
1y,
3-9.XII.1991;
3Y,
10-16.XII.1991,
1(3,
1.X.1998;
1
y,
5.X.1998;
1(3,
15.X.1998;
2Y,
21.X.1998;
1
y,
4.XI.1998;
2(3,
22.IX.2000;
3(3,
29.IX.2000;
4(3,
06.X.2000;
1y,
4(3,
13.X.2000;
1(3,
20.X.2000;
2(3,
27.X.2000;
1(3,
03.XI.2000;
1(3,
10.XI.2000;
1y,
17.XI.2000;
2(3,
23.X.2007;
1(3,
30.X.2007.
Barroso,
1(3,
2.X.2010,
R.
L.
Tanque
col.
(UFLA).
Lavras,
1y,
13.IX.1998,
Campus
UFLA,
J.
G.
Padua
col.
(UFLA).
Altogether
71
specimens
of
E.
diae
sp.
n.
were
examined.
All
but
the
specimen
from
Lavras,
for
which
no
information
is
available,
were
collected
in
Malaise
traps.
The
great
majority,
67
specimens,
were captured
in
a
for-
est
reserve
inside
the
Campus
Pampulha
of
the
Universidade
Federal
de
Minas
Gerais
(UFMG),
appearing
in
the
traps
only
from
September
to
December.
ENICOSPILUS
RAMIDULUS
SPECIES
-GROUP
Zootaxa
3409
©
2012
Magnolia
Press
67
All
specimens
of
E.
diae
sp.
n.
collected
in
Belo
Horizonte
are
deposited
in
the
UFMG,
except
for
two
pairs
of
paratypes,
which
will
be
sent
to
the
American
Entomological
Institute
(AEI)
and
to
the
entomological
collection
of
the
U.
S.
National
Museum
of
Natural
History
(USNM)
respectively.
The
specimens
collected
in
Barroso
and
Lavras
are
deposited
in
the
UFLA
collection.
Key
to
Neotropical*
species
of
Enicospilus
ramidulus
species
-group
*
The
Enicospilus
of
the
Galapagos
Islands
are
not
considered
in
this
key.
For
more
details
about
them,
see
Gauld
and
Carter
(1983).
1
Fore
wing
vein
cu
-a
reaching
M+Cu
distad
of
the
base
of
Rs&M
(Fig.
2A)
E.
cheoi
Fernandez-Triana,
2005
1'
Fore
wing
vein
cu
-a
reaching
M+Cu
coincident
or
proximal
to
the
base
of
Rs&M
2
2(1')
Central
sclerite
of
fore
wing
discosubmarginal
cell
absent
(Fig.
2B)
E
neotropicus
Hooker,
1912
2'
Central
sclerite
of
fore
wing
discosubmarginal
cell
present,
distinctly
pigmented
or
with
only
an
almost
indistinct,
unpig-
mented
thickening
present
in
the
fenestra
3
3(2')
Central
sclerite
of
fore
wing
discosubmarginal
cell
strongly
sclerotized,
thicker
than
Rs+2r,
subcircular
to
D
-shaped
(Fig.
2C);
notauli
entirely
absent
E
purgatus
(Say,
1835)
3'
Central
sclerite
on
fore
wing
discosubmarginal
cell
weakly
sclerotized,
thinner
than
Rs+2r,
irregularly
shaped
(Figs
2D,
4A);
notauli
weak
but
discernible
4
4(3')
Upper
mandibular
tooth
3
or
more
times
as
long
as
lower
tooth;
fore
wing
distal
sclerite
absent
(Fig.
2D);
5-6
hamuli
on
hind
wing
vein
R1
E.
doylei
Gauld,
1988
4'
Upper
mandibular
tooth 1.3
times
as
long
as
lower
tooth;
fore
wing
distal
sclerite
present
(Fig.
4A);
8-9
hamuli
on
hind
wing
vein
R1
E.
diae
sp
n.
Acknowledgments
We
thank
Dr
Fernando
A.
Silveira
(UFMG)
and
Dr
Gavin
Broad
(Natural
History
Museum,
London)
for
useful
comments
and
suggestions,
and
Dr
Augusto
Loureiro
Henriques
(INPA)
and
Ricardo
Lima
Tanque
(UFLA)
for
the
loan
of
specimens.
A.R.L.
is
grateful
to
FAPEMIG
(the
Minas
Gerais
State
funding
agency)
for
a
graduate
scholar-
ship.
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De
Santis,
L.
(1980)
Catalogo
de
los
Himenopteros
Brasile/7os
de
La
Serie
Parasitica,
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Bethyloidea.
Editora
da
Uni-
versidade
Federal
do
Parana,
Curitiba.
395pp.
Fernandez-Triana,
J.L.
(2005)
The
taxonomy
and
biogeography
of
Cuban
Ophioninae
(Hymenoptera:
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Zoot-
axa,
1007,
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Gauld,
I.D.
(1985)
The
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classification
and
evolution
of
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the
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Ophioninae
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History)
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51,
61-185.
Gauld,
I.D.
(1988)
A
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Mesoamerica
with
special
reference
to
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fauna
of
Costa
Rica.
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of
the
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Museum
(Natural
History)
(Entomology),
57,
1-309.
Gauld,
I.D.
&
Carter,
J.M.
(1983)
The
Ophioninae
of
the
Galapagos
Islands
(Hymenoptera:
Ichneumonidae).
Journal
of
Natu-
ral
History,
17,
145-155.
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C.W.
(1912)
The
Ichneumon
fl
ies
of
America
belonging
to
the
tribe
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of
the
American
Entomo-
logical
Society,
38,
1-176.
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T.
(1835)
Descriptions
of
new
North
American
Hymenoptera,
and
observations
on
some
already
described.
Boston
Jour-
nal
of
Natural
History,
1,
210-305.
Yu,
D.S.,
van
Achterberg,
K.
&
Horstmann,
K.
(2012)
World
Ichneumonoidea
2011.
Taxonomy,
Biology,
Morphology
and
Dis-
tribution.
CD/DVD.
Taxapad,
Vancouver,
Canada.
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68
Zootaxa
3409
©
2012
Magnolia
Press
LIMA
ET
AL.