Effect of monensin, laidomycin, and lasalocid on coccidiosis control weight gain and feed intake in young calves


Thomas, E.E.; Parrott, J.C.; Speer, C.A.; Lechtenberg, K.F.

Journal of Dairy Science 81(4): 1200

1998


Eighty Holstein male calves were purchased at 1 to 2 d of age and fed non-medicated milk replacer (weaned at 6 wks) and starter feed until 8 wks of age (Trial 1) or 12 wks. Feeding of treatment diets was then initiated that contained monensin (24.4 and 36.6), laidlomycin (12.2), and lasalocid (36.6) ppm DMB. Three days later calves were inoculated orally with approximately 500,000 oocysts (82% E. bovis, 10% E. zuernii, 9% other E. species). Calves remained on treatment 4 wks post challenge, during which daily gain, daily feed intake, and oocyst counts were determined. Weight gain was increased by monensin 36.6 ppm (P<.05) compared to controls. Although not significant (P>.05), total oocyst counts tended to be lowest for monensin 36.6 ppm and feed intake was highest for the monensin treatments. Calculated feed/gain was improved most with the monensin 36.6 ppm treatment.

1200
JOURNAL
OF
DAIRY
SCIENCE
190
Performance
of
calves
fed
different
starters
diets
aimed
at
developing
the
rumen.
N.
D.
Luchini*
1
,
D.
Hefner',
D.
Waterman
2
,
and
K.
Klanderman
3
,
"Continental
Grain
Company
2
Milk
Specialties
Company
3
Feed
Flavors,
Inc.
One
hundred
twenty
Holstein
male
calves
approximately
3
d
of
age
were
ran-
domly
assigned
to
one
of
four
treatments:
Control
(C),
fed
a
starter
diet
from
d
7
to
d
84;
Flavor
(F),
as
C
with
the
addition
of
two
commercial
fl
avors;
Sugar
(S),
as
C
with
the
addition
of
highly
fermentable
sugars,
and
Bolus
(B)
as
C,
dosed
a
bolus
of
freeze-dried
ruminal
microorganisms
at
d
14,
21, 28,
35
and
42.
Calves
were
fed
twice
a
day
.227
kg
milk
replacer
d
0
to
d
42.
Starter
diet
was
provided
ad
libitum
from
d
7.
Body
weights
were
recorded
at
d
0,
14,
28,
42,
56
and
84.
Starter
intakes
were
recorded
daily
for
each
calf
from
d
7
to
d
56.
Scour
scores,
treatments
and
cost
per
treatment
were
recorded
from
d
0
to
d
21.
Seven
calves
were
randomly
selected
from
each
treatment
and
blood
samples
were
withdrawn
at
d
0,
14,
28,
42
and
56.
Samples
were
analyzed
for
glucose,
NEFA,
and
urea
nitrogen,
concentrations.
There
were
no
differences
in
fecal
scores,
times
calves
were
medicated
or
average
cost
per
calf
between
the
treatments.
There
were
no
differences
in
the
NEFA,
glucose
or
urea
nitrogen
concentration
among
treatments,
The
overall
(d
7
to
d
56)
daily
average
dry
feed
intake
was
higher
for
C
and
F
than
for
S
calves
(.05
<
P
<
.1)).
Control
and
F
calves
had
higher
average
daily
intakes
from
d
22
to
d
28
(P=.08),
and
from
d
50
to
d
56
(P=.09).
This
small
difference
in
the
dry
matter
intake
is
reflected
in
the
BW
of
the
C
and
F
calves
(P
<.05).
Body
weight
i
l
l
average
daily
gain
(ADG)
and
starter
DMI
Treatments
Day
0
40.17 40.17
40.17 40.17
42
55.07
4
55.56
4
51.75
6
54.1
46
0.03
56
63.74
4
63.88
4
57.94
6
62.37
46
0.01
84
88.87
4
89.16
4
79.34
6
85.39
46
0.02
ADG
from
d
0
to
d
84
0.58
4
0.58
4
0.47
6
0.54
45
0.02
Starter
DMI
from
d
7
to
d
56
0.474
4
0.459
4
0.403
6
0.430
46
0.09
1
Covariately
adjusted
by
weight
at
day
0
"
,
'Means
with
different
superscripts
differ
(P
<.05)
192
Effect
of
monensin,
laidlomycin,
and
lasalocid
on
coccidiosis
control,
weight
gain
and
feed
intake
in
young
calves.
E.
E.
Thomas*
1
,
J.
C.
Parrott',
C.
A.
Speer
2
,
and
K.
F.
Lechtenberg
3
,
1
Elanco
Animal
Health,
Indianapolis,
IN,
2
Montana
State
University,
Bozeman,
3
Midwest
Veterinary
Service,
Inc.,
Oakland,
NE.
Eighty
Holstein
male
calves
were
purchased
at
1
to
2
d
of
age
and
fed
non
-medicated
milk
replacer
(weaned
at
6
wks)
and
starter
feed
until
8
wks
of
age
(Trial
1)
or
12
wks.
Feeding
of
treatment
diets
was
then
initiated
that
contained
monensin
(24.4
and
36.6),
laidlomycin
(12.2),
and
lasalocid
(36.6)
ppm
DMB.
Three
days
later
calves
were
inocu-
lated
orally
with
approximately
500,000
oocysts
(82%
E.
bovis,
10%
E.
zuernii,
9%
other
E.
species).
Calves
remained
on
treatment
4
wks
post
challenge,
during
which
daily
gain,
daily
feed
intake,
and
oocyst
counts
were
determined.
Laidlo
Lasal
Monen
Monen
Item
Control
12.2
ppm
36.6
ppm
24.4
ppm
36.6
ppm
Feed
intake,
kg/d
2.61
2.66
2.69
2.73
2.72
Weight
gain,
kg/d 0.80'
1.00
46
1.04'
6
1.04'
6
1.14
6
Feed/gain
3.26
2.66
2.59
2.63
2.39
Total
oocysts
1.80
1.89
1.73
1.56
"'Least
square
means
with
different
superscripts
are
significantly
differ-
ent
(P<.05).
'Expressed
as
log
so
oocysts/g
feces.
Determined
during
weeks
3
and
4.
No
data
collected
for
Laidlomycin
because
of
no
claim
for
coccidia
control.
Weight
gain
was
increased
by
monensin
36.6
ppm
(P<.05)
compared
to
controls.
Although
not
significant
(P>.05),
total
oocyst
counts
tended
to
be
lowest
for
monensin
36.6
ppm
and
feed
intake
was
highest
for
the
monensin
treatments.
Calculated
feed/gain
was
improved
most
with
the
monensin
36.6
ppm
treatment.
195
Response
of
lactating
dairy
cows
to
a
direct
-fed
cel-
lulase/xylanase
enzyme
mixture
applied
to
the
forage
por-
tion
of
corn
silage/alfalfa
hay
-based
total
mixed
rations.
D.
J.
Schingoethe*
1
,
G.
A.
Stegemanl,
and
R.
J.
Treacher
2
,
1
South
Dakota
State
University,
Brookings,
2
Finnfeeds
International,
Marlbor-
ough,
UK.
Fifty
Holstein
cows
(20
primiparous
and
30
multiparous)
were
used
to
evaluate
the
dose
response
to
a
direct
-fed
cellulase/xylanase
enzyme
mixture
applied
to
the
forage
portion
(60%
corn
silage
and
40%
alfalfa
hay)
of
a
total
mixed
ration.
Cows
were
fed
1
of
5
treatment
diets
for
12
wk.
Diets
I
through
4
were
55%
forage:45%
concentrate
and
consisted
of
untreated
negative
control,
0.7
L,
1.0
L,
or
1.5
L
of
enzyme
concentrate/t
of
forage
DM,
respectively.
Diet
5
was
an
untreated
positive
control
of
45%
forage:55%
concentrate.
Production
of
milk,
3.5%
FCM,
and
energy
-corrected
milk
(ECM:
26.9,
28.8, 29.5,
31.2,
and
30.3
kg/d)
increased
(P
<
0.01)
due
to
enzyme
treatments
and
was
simi-
lar
(P
<
0.72)
to
production
of
cows
fed
diet
5.
Responses
to
enzyme
-treated
forages
occurred
within
2
to
4
wk
after
cows
started
consuming
the
treated
forages
and
were
maintained
throughout
the
remainder
of
the
experiment.
Percentages
of
milk
fat
(3.70,
3.83,
3.92, 3.84,
and
3.86)
and
protein
(3.28,
3.37,
3.43,
3.36,
and
3.40)
were
higher
(P
<
0.02)
for
cows
fed
enzyme
-treated
forages
or
th
o
e
positive
control
diet.
Responses
were
similar
(P
>
0.21)
for
primiparous
and
multiparous
cows.
Dry
matter
intakes
(20.6,
21.4,
20.3,
22.3,
21.9
kg/d)
were
similar
(P
>
0.47)
for
cows
fed
all
diets.
Cows
that
started
receiving
the
enzyme
-treated
forage
during
the
fi
rst
100
d
in
milk
(avg
=
64
d
for
5
cows/trt)
produced
9
to
15%
more
milk
(P
<
0.08),
17
to
24%
more
3.5%
FCM
(P<
0.01),
and
16
to
23%
more
ECM
(P
<
0.01)
than
cows
fed
diet
1,
reflecting
improved
persistency
in
production.
However,
production
was
not
increased
(P
>
0.41)
when
cows
were
in
mid
-lactation
at
the
start
of
the
experiment.
Production
responses
to
enzyme
-treated
forages
at
55:45
forage:concentrate
were
similar
to
the
response
of
increasing
the
proportion
of
concentrates
fed
with
untreated
forages
to
45:55
forage:concentrate.
197
Protein
requirements
of
transition
dairy
cows.
R.
Greenfield*
1
,
S.
S.
Donkinl,
M.
J.
Cecava
2
,
and
T.
R.
Johnson',
'Purdue
University,
West
Lafayette,
IN,
2
Consolidated
Nutrition,
L.C.,
Fort
Wayne,
IN.
Feeding
strategies
of
transition
dairy
cows
contribute
to
the
risk
factors
asso-
ciated
with
metabolic
disorders
that
limit
production
in
the
ensuing
lactation.
To
investigate
the
effects
of
prepartum
dietary
protein
concentration
and
level
of
rumen-undegradable
protein
(RUP)
on
postpartum
health
and
production,
40
multiparous
Holstein
cows
were
blocked
by
expected
calving
date
and
as-
signed
to
one
of
four
isocaloric
prepartum
rations
beginning
28
days
prior
to
expected
calving
date.
Prepartum
rations
were:
12%
CP
and
26%
RUP,
16%
CP
and
26%
RUP,
16%
CP
and
33%
RUP,
or
16%
CP
and
40%
RUP
on
a
dry
matter
basis.
All
cows
received
the
same
postpartum
diet
(18%
CP,
40%
RUP)
from
1
to
56
days
postpartum.
Prepartum
dry
matter
intake
(DMI)
was
not
different
among
dietary
treatments.
Postpartum
intakes
(kg/d)
were
higher
(P
<
.05)
for
cows
receiving
the
12%
CP:
26%
RUP
diet
prepartum
compared
with
any
of
the
16%CP
diets
(22.0
±
0.98
vs
19.5
±
1.04,
18.8
±
1.03,
18.8
±
1.03;
12%
CP:
26%
RUP
vs
16%
CP:
26%
RUP,
16%
CP:
33%
RUP,
16%
CP:
40%
RUP).
Cows
receiving
the
12%
CP:
26%
RUP
diet
during
the
transition
period
produced
more
milk
for
the
fi
rst
56
days
of
lactation
(P
<
.05)
than
cows
receiving
any
of
the
16
%
CP
diets
(22.0
±
0.98
vs
19.5
±
1.04,
18.8
±
1.03,
18.8
±
1.03;
12%
CP:
26%
RUP
vs
16%
CP:
26%
RUP,
16%
CP:
33%
RUP,
16%
CP:
40%
RUP).
There
was
a
day
of
lactation
x
prepartum
diet
interaction
(1'
<
.05)
with
the
greatest
effect
of
the
12%
CP:
26%
RUP
diet
evident
during
the
fi
rst
35
days
of
lactation.
No
significant
differences
were
found
among
treatments
for
milkfat,
milk
protein,
somatic
cell
count,
or
milk
urea
nitrogen.
Liver
triglycerides
(mg/g
DM)
on
day
1
postpartum
were
not
different
among
treatments.
Plasma
glucose,
calcium,
urea
nitrogen,
and
non-
esterified
fatty
acids
were
not
significantly
different
among
treatments.
The
data
indicate
carryover
effects
of
prepartum
dietary
protein
on
postpartum
intake
and
milk
production,
pointig
to
beneficial
effects
of
low
dietary
protein
for
transition
dairy
cows.
Journal
of
Dairy
Science
Vol.
81,
No.
4,
1998