Rearing of Tabanus nigrovittatus Macquart (Diptera: Tabanidae) from egg to adult


Sofield, R.K.; Hansens, E.J.

Journal of the New York Entomological Society 88(1): 75

1980


Host-seeking female salt marsh greenheads, Tabanus nigrovittatus, were collected from box traps on a salt marsh near Cedarville, NJ. Flies were allowed to blood feed on human forearm or restrained guinea pig. Ten egg masses were oviposited by these flies. The egg masses turned grey-brown with a chalky covering several hours after oviposition. The egg masses were loosely cemented together. Each egg mass was removed from the cage and placed on moist filter paper in a petri dish until hatching occurred. Seven masses hatched after 5 days yielding 508 larvae. Larvae were reared at 27 C in individual 8 dram vials with wet filter paper. Every 2-5 days the filter paper was changed and fresh food (house fly maggot or earth worm) provided. Larval mortality was highest in the first 40 days. Only 12.5% of the larvae survived this period. Three to five months after hatching, half the larvae were subjected to 5 C for 40 days and the remainder for 80 days. The rearing temperature was then returned to 27 C. Pupation of 26 larvae from four egg masses occurred 6-9 months after hatching. A single larva pupated 60 days after hatching. The pupal stage lasted 7-12 days. Of the 14 females reared, 7 oviposited a mass of infertile eggs, 3 took a blood meal after oviposition, and one fly oviposited a second mass of infertile eggs.

VOLUME
LXXXVIII,
NUMBER
1
75
Four
frame
honey
bee
nucleus
colonies
were
established
and
stocked
with
50
Braula
coeca
each.
One
or
more
lice
were
present
on
24%
of
the
mated
queen
honey
bees
observed between
August
and
December.
Only
2%
of
the
virgin
queens
observed
harbored
lice
during
the
same
period.
Almost
no
lice
were
present
on
queens
during
preceding
months.
In
an
established
apiary
known
to
be
infested
with
Braula,
no
lice
were
observed
on
queens
April
through
June
15.
62%
of
the
queens
examined
from
June
16
through
the
rest
of
the
season
harbored
lice
and
58%
of
these
lice
were
pale
in
color,
indicating
Braula
were
less
than
one
-day
old.
It
appears
that
newly
emerged
bee
lice
are
attracted
to
mated
queens.
Rearing
of
Tabanus
nigrovittatus
Macquart
(Diptera:
Tabanidae)
from
egg
to
adult.
R.
K.
Sofield
and
E.
J.
Hansens,
Dept.
of
Entomol.
and
Econ.
Zool.,
Rutgers
Univ.,
New
Brunswick,
NJ
08903
Host
-seeking
female
salt
marsh
greenheads,
Tabanus
nigrovittatus,
were
collected
from
box
traps
on
a
salt
marsh
near
Cedarville,
NJ.
Flies
were
allowed
to
blood
feed
on
human
forearm
or
restrained
guinea
pig.
Ten
egg
masses
were
oviposited
by
these
fl
ies.
The
egg
masses
turned
grey
-brown
with
a
chalky
covering
several
hours
after
oviposition.
The
egg
masses
were
loosely
cemented
together.
Each
egg
mass
was
removed
from
the
cage
and
placed
on
moist
fi
lter
paper
in
a
petri
dish
until
hatching
occurred.
Seven
masses
hatched
after
5
days
yielding
508
larvae.
Larvae
were
reared
at
27
C
in
individual
8
dram
vials
with
wet
fi
lter
paper.
Every
2-5
days
the
fi
lter
paper
was
changed
and
fresh
food
(house
fl
y
maggot
or
earth
worm)
pro-
vided.
Larval
mortality
was
highest
in
the
fi
rst
40
days.
Only
12.5%
of
the
larvae
survived
this
period.
Three
to
fi
ve
months
after
hatching,
half
the
larvae
were
subjected
to
5
C
for
40
days
and
the
remainder
for
80
days.
The
rearing
temperature
was
then
returned
to
27
C.
Pupation
of
26
larvae
from
four
egg
masses
occurred
6-9
months
after
hatching.
A
single
larva
pupated
60
days
after
hatching.
The
pupal
stage
lasted
7-12
days.
Of
the
14
females
reared,
7
oviposited
a
mass
of
infertile
eggs,
3
took
a
blood
meal
after
oviposition,
and
one
fl
y
oviposited
a
second
mass
of
infertile
eggs.
Transmission
of
equine
babesiosis
and
bovine
anaplasmosis
by
Dermacen-
tor
albipictus
(Packard)
(Acari:
Ixodidae).
D.
Stiller,
W.
M.
Frerichs,
G.
Leatch*,
and
K.
L.
Kuttler,
Animal
Parasitol.
Inst.,
SEA,
USDA,
Belts-
ville,
MD
20705,
and
*Commonwealth
Sci.
and
Indust.
Res.
Org.,
Indoo-
roopilly,
QLD
4068,
Australia
Although
the
1
-host
winter
tick,
Dermacentor
albipictus,
is
a
common
parasite
of
horses
and
cattle
and
is
widely
distributed
in
the
U.S.,
its
role
as
a
potential
vector
of
the
hemoparasitic
diseases
equine
babesiosis
and
bovine
anaplasmosis
has
been
little
studied.
Experiments
to
assess
the
vec-
UTC