Effect of different levels and combinations of lasalocid and monensin on broiler performance, water consumption, and prevention of coccidiosis


Patel, M.B.; Nam, C.W.; Bishawi, K.O.; McGinnis, J.

Poultry Science 59(7): 1649

1980


The effects of feeding different levels and combinations of lasalocid (LA) and monensin (MO) (15 drug treatments) on chick growth and water consumption were studied in a 2 week battery trial and in a 7 week floor trial. In the floor pen trial, all chicks were given at 4 weeks of age a mixture of oocysts of E. acervulina/mivati, E. maxima, E. necatrix, and E. tenella mixed in the feed. In both trials increasing the level of MO alone or in combination with LA depressed growth. The MO decreased water intake. The LA alone or in combination with MO gave only a slight or no increase in water intake and did not affect growth. Sixteen chicks from each treatment in the floor pen trial were posted at 6 days postinfection to score for coccidiosis lesions. About 40% of the unsupplemented control chicks were dead by 6 days postinfection. With LA and MO alone coccidiosis mortality was 0 and 2%, respectively. None of the other treatments had more than 1% coccidiosis mortality. The lesion scores for the upper, mid-gut, and ceca for the unsupplemented control were 2.25, 2.06, and 1.38, respectively, out of 3.0. The LA and combinations with MO appeared to be more protective than MO alone based on lesion scores.

ABSTRACTS
OF
PAPERS
1649
bility
of
dehulled
soybean
meal
(DSM).
In
Experiment
1,
feed
was
removed
from
12
White
Leghorn
roosters,
and
excreta
were
collected
for
6,
18,
24,
30,
42,
and
48
hr.
Results
indicated
that
between
18
and
24
hr
were
required
for
complete
clearance
of
dietary
residues
from
roosters
previously
consuming
feed
ad
libitum.
In
Experiments
2
and
3,
roosters
were
force-fed
25
or
50
and
20
or
40
g
of
DSM,
respectively,
and
in
Experiment
4,
adult
turkeys
were
force-fed
100,
200,
or
300
g
of
DSM.
Excreta
were
collected
for
48
hr
after
feeding.
Lower
dry
matter
digestibility
and
TME
values
were
obtained
for
48
-hr
collection
periods
as
compared
to
24
-hr
collection
periods.
Average
dry
matter
digestibility
(%)
and
TME
(kcal/g)
of
DSM
were
46.5
±
1.6
and
3.003
±
.110
for
chickens
and
56.8
±
2.8
and
3.278
±
.016
for
turkeys,
respectively.
Average
digestibility
of
amino
acids
in
DSM
was
90%
for
both
chickens
and
turkeys.
As
the
length
of
the
acid
hydrolysis
period
during
amino
acid
analysis
of
DSM
and
excreta
samples
was
increased
from
24
to
48
and
72
hr,
threonine,
serine,
and
tyrosine
levels
decreased
and
glycine
levels
increased.
Amino
acid
composition
of
microbial
cells
harvested
from
chicken
excreta
was
similar
to
amino
acid
composition
of
excreta
(endogenous
and/or
feed
residues)
collected
from
fasted
birds
or
birds
force-fed
DSM.
EFFECT
OF
DIFFERENT
LEVELS
AND
COMBIN-
ATIONS
OF
LASALOCID
AND
MONENSIN
ON
BROILER
PERFORMANCE,
WATER
CON-
SUMPTION,
AND
PREVENTION
OF
COCCI-
DIOSIS
M.
B.
Patel,
C.
W.
Nam,
K.
0.
Bishawi,
and
J.
McGinnis,
Department
of
Animal
Sciences,
Washington
State
University,
Pullman,
WA
99164
The
effects
of
feeding
different
levels
and
combina-
tions
of
lasalocid
(LA)
and
monensin
(MO)
(15
drug
treatments)
on
chick
growth
and
water
consumption
were
studied
in
a
2
week
battery
trial
and
in
a
7
week
floor
trial.
In
the
floor
pen
trial,
all
chicks
were
given
at
4
weeks
of
age
a
mixture
of
oocysts
of
E.
acervulina/mivati,
E.
maxima,
E.
necatrix,
and
E.
tenella
mixed
in
the
feed.
In
both
trials
increasing
the
level
of
MO
alone
or
in
combination
with
LA
depressed
growth.
The
MO
decreased
water
intake.
The
LA
alone
or
in
combination
with
MO
gave
only
a
slight
or
no
increase
in
water
intake
and
did
not
affect
growth.
Sixteen
chicks
from
each
treatment
in
the
fl
oor
pen
trial
were
posted
at
6
days
postinfection
to
score
for
coccidiosis
lesions.
About
40%
of
the
un-
supplemented
control
chicks
were
dead
by
6
days
postinfection.
With
LA
and
MO
alone
coccidiosis
mortality
was
0
and
2%,
respectively.
None
of
the
other
treatments
had
more
than
1%
coccidiosis
mortality.
The
lesion
scores
for
the
upper,
mid
-gut,
and
ceca
for
the
unsupplemented
control
were
2.25,
2.06,
and
1.38,
respectively,
out
of
3.0.
The
LA
and
combinations
with
MO
appeared
to
be
more
pro-
tective
than
MO
alone
based
on
lesion
scores.
VARIABILITY
IN
CHICK
GROWTH
DEPRESSING
EFFECT
OF
DIFFERENT
CULTIVARS
AND
GENETIC
LINES
OF
GRAIN
LEGUMES
M.
B.
Patel,
S.
Ray,
and
J.
McGinnis,
Department
of
Animal
Sciences,
Washington
State
University,
Pullman,
WA
99164
A
chick
bioassay
procedure
developed
at
WSU
was
used
for
studying
factors
that
depress
chick
growth
to
evaluate
a
collection
of
grain
legumes.
The
control
diet
contained
50%
glucose
and
50%
of
a
premix
that
supplied
all
of
the
required
nutrients
except
a
part
of
the
energy.
Test
materials
replaced
50%
glucose
to
form
the
experimental
diets.
In
these
experiments,
all
test
materials
were
autoclaved
at
121
C
for
20
min.
All
the
experiments
were
conducted
with
broiler
chicks
from
hatching
to
2
weeks.
Upon
termination,
screen
fl
oors
were
evaluated
for
adherence
of
fecal
material
by
visual
scoring.
Eighty-four
samples
of
beans
and
peas
representing
different
varieties
and
genetic
backgrounds
were
as-
sayed.
Body
weight,
feed
efficiency,
and
stickiness
of
feces
as
measured
by
screen
scores
varied
among
and
within
different
varieties
of
beans.
Large
lima
beans,
cow
peas,
and
chick
peas
were
found
to
be
less
growth
depressing
than
all
of
the
other
materials
tested.
Screen
scores
for
adherence
of
feces
indicate
that
the
factor
causing
this
effect
is
different
from
the
growth
depressing
factor.
THE
POULTRY
ENTERPRISE
SYSTEM
—A
"HANDS
ON"
APPROACH
TO
TEACHING
R.
K.
Pautz
and
R.
A.
Voitle,
Poultry
Industry
Depart-
ment,
California
Polytechnic
State
University,
San
Luis
Obispo,
CA
93407
Poultry
production
enterprise
projects
have
been
an
integral
part
of
the
instructional
program
in
agri-
culture
at
California
State
Polytechnic
University,
San
Luis
Obispo,
for
50
years.
Students
majoring
in
poultry
industry
and
interested
students
in
other
majors
are
encouraged
to
become
operators
of
enter-
prises
involving
the
production
of
eggs,
replacement
pullets,
broilers,
turkeys,
and
gamebirds
on
a
voluntary
basis.
Participation
enables
students
to
gain
experience
in
production
techniques,
processing
methods,
budget
preparation,
and
maintaining
records.
Equipment
and
facilities
in
support
of
the
program
are
provided
by
the
University.
The
necessary
poultry
fl
ocks
are
maintained
by
the
University
Foundation
which
also
provides
financial
support.
Student
operators
and
the
Foundation
share
in
profits
resulting
from
the
enterprise.
In
the
event
of
a
loss,
the
oper-
ator's
share
is
limited
to
time
and
effort.
Students
participating
in
the
enterprise
program
have
the
opportunity
to
gain
practical
skills
which
potentially
improves
employment
opportunities
upon
graduation.
In
addition,
those
students
preparing
to
become
vocational
agriculture
teachers
gain
poultry
production
knowledge
and
skills
that
potentially
enhance
their
abilities
as
teachers
of
poultry
related
subjects
at
the
high
school
level.
THE
AVAILABILITY
OF
CHOLINE
IN
SOYBEAN
OIL
MEAL
G.
M.
Pesti,
N.
J.
Benevenga,
A.
E.
Harper,
and
M.
L.
Sunde,
Poultry
Science
and
Nutritional
Sciences,
University
of
Wisconsin,
1675
Observatory
Dr.,
Madison,
WI
53706
A
bioassay
was
used
to
determine
the
availability